Hundreds of Canadians to receive postcards detailing Second World War link

Organization will be mailing postcards to former homes of soldiers

Hundreds of Canadians are about to receive proof of their personal, largely unknown links to one of the defining events of the 20th century. An organization dedicated to commemorating Canada’s role in the Second World War will be mailing out postcards, one of which is shown in a handout, to the former homes of soldiers who died in the first five days of the pivotal D-Day campaign, which helped secure victory for allied troops against Germany. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Juno Beach Centre Association)

Hundreds of Canadians are about to receive proof of their personal, largely unknown links to one of the defining events of the 20th century. An organization dedicated to commemorating Canada’s role in the Second World War will be mailing out postcards, one of which is shown in a handout, to the former homes of soldiers who died in the first five days of the pivotal D-Day campaign, which helped secure victory for allied troops against Germany. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Juno Beach Centre Association)

Hundreds of Canadians are about to receive proof of their personal, largely unknown links to one of the defining events of the 20th century.

An organization dedicated to commemorating Canada’s role in the Second World War will be mailing out postcards to the former homes of soldiers who died in the first five days of the pivotal D-Day campaign, which helped secure victory for allied troops against Germany.

The postcards, prepared and mailed by the Juno Beach Centre Association, will inform present-day residents about the soldier who enlisted from their address decades before. The messages will contain basic biographical details, the soldier’s rank and military affiliation, and information about when and where he was killed.

The commemorative project, meant to honour the 75th anniversary of the D-Day campaign, has Toronto resident Paula Monahan eagerly checking her mailbox for the document she says will serve as a tangible link to an important yet tragic part of Canada’s past.

READ MORE: World War II vet dies during ‘Honour Flight’ trip

“There’s something very solemn about the fact that you live in a house (from where) a 22-year-old went off to battle and never came back,” Monahan said in a telephone interview. “We will certainly cherish the postcard when we get it.”

The 22-year-old in question was Rifleman Thomas Joseph Pierce, who listed Monahan’s west-Toronto address on the attestation papers he completed upon joining the armed forces.

Pierce, son of Thomas and Mary Pierce, served in the second battalion of the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada prior to his death on D-Day.

He was one of the estimated 156,000 British, American and Canadian troops to storm a 75-kilometre stretch of beach in northern France beginning on June 6, 1944. The 14,000 Canadian soldiers were assigned to an area dubbed Juno Beach, where they were eventually tasked with reaching a local rail line and beating back the assault from German troops.

Mike Bechthold, executive director of the Juno Beach Centre Association, said the 76-day campaign exacted a high death toll from all nations involved, with 903 Canadians perishing in the first five days.

Bechthold said those tasked with preparing the postcards mined attestation records from those soldiers, which are preserved in a combination of government archives and online genealogy sites.

He said more than half of the addresses listed on those documents are no longer valid, replaced by new developments or rendered obsolete by changing geographical boundaries. But he said valid addresses were found in nearly 400 cases, and residents at those homes should expect to receive their postcards over the next week or two.

Bechthold — a historian by trade — said the postcards should be seen as the letters that the slain soldiers “would have sent home if they could have.” He said he hopes they will also help Canadians to connect the dots between the increasingly distant past and the lives they lead today.

Monahan, for her part, intends to enlist her military buff brother to do some research and learn what he can about Pierce.

Meanwhile Richard Sawyers, who expects to receive a postcard at the midtown Toronto seafood shop where he now serves as manager, is eager to take on the research himself.

Lance Sgt. George Wilfred Morrison of the Queen’s Own Rifles, who died on D-Day at age 27, enlisted from the address where Sawyers’ workplace now stands.

“I’ll be straight on Google to find out more information, see if I can track him down,” Sawyers said. “In Toronto everything’s always very new, so a wee bit of history about the place is always very nice.”

When the postcard arrives, Sawyers said he plans to display it in the shop window to try and spread the word about the soldier and his connection with the neighbourhood to customers.

For Bechthold, Sawyers’ plan fits perfectly with the aim of the postcard project.

“There’s history all around us, yet it’s almost like we walk around with blinders on,” he said. “The people living in these houses … have no concept of what happened there. This is an opportunity to sort of open their eyes and get them attuned to a different wavelength.”

Michelle McQuigge , The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

The RCMP presence in Central Okanagan public schools is being reviewed by the board of education. (File photo)
RCMP presence welcomed in Central Okanagan public schools

Staff survey feedback overwhelmingly positive from students, staff and parents

Two e-scooters parked on the sidewalk along Water Street in downtown Kelowna on Monday, May 3. Scooters parked on walkways are causing accessibility issues for some people with disabilities. (Michael Rodriguez/Capital News)
Kelowna General Hospital clinicians observe increase in e-scooter injuries

A report is set to go to city council next week on how the e-scooter pilot has gone thus far

A rock quarry. (Markus Distelrath/Pixabay)
Regional district declines support of proposed Joe Rich quarry

The Regional District of Central Okanagan is one of the referral agencies for the application

(Pixabay photo)
Kelowna wants you to water its trees this summer

The city is asking residents to lend a hand and water city-owned trees amid drought-like conditions

(OK Corral Cabaret/Facebook)
Kelowna’s OK Corral preparing for fall comeback

The music club closed in July 2020 due to the pandemic

Dr. Albert de Villiers, chief medical health officer for the Interior Health Authority. (Contributed)
Black Press Media Weekly Roundup: Top headlines this week

Here’s a summary of this week’s biggest stories from the Okanagan-Shuswap

Jane Linden
KCR: Volunteering keeps you active

Kelowna Community Resources shares stories of its volunteers in a weekly column

57-year-old Kathleen Richardson was discovered deceased in her home Wednesday, June 9, 2021. Her death is considered a homicide and connected to the slain brothers found on a Naramata forest road. (Submitted)
Naramata community in shock as condolences pour in for homicide victim Kathy Richardson

Richardson was well liked in the community, a volunteer firefighter with a home-based salon

British Columbia-Yukon Community News Association’s 2021 Ma Murray Awards were handed out during a virtual ceremony on Friday, June 10. (Screen grab)
Black Press Media winners take gold at B.C. and Yukon journalism awards

Publications received nods in dozens of categories

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Princeton GSAR responds 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. In 2020 the crew was called out 34 times, and members spent 721 hours on calls, and 683 hours training. Photo Princeton GSAR Facebook
Teen missing in Manning Park found after 24 hours

Young man spends night on mountain and survives with just a few scrapes

The RCMP are asking for assistance regarding the death of Kathleen Richardson of Naramata, pictured here. Her death is believed to be related to two homicides in Naramata in May. (RCMP)
Police identify South Okanagan homicide victim as 57-year-old Naramata woman

57-year-old Kathleen Richardson was discovered deceased in her home Wednesday

Fair-goers take a ride at the 120th annual Armstrong Interior Provincial Exhibition and Stampede Aug. 28-Sept. 1, 2019. (Katherine Peters - Morning Star)
Armstrong’s IPE not eligible for COVID-19 grant designed for major attractions

Shuswap MLA Greg Kyllo criticized the rigidity of the provincial program’s criteria

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau greets campers while visiting McDougall, Ont. on Thursday, July 19, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
71% of B.C. men say they’d prefer to go camping with Trudeau: survey

Most British Columbians with plans to go camping outdoors say they’d prefer to go with Trudeau or Shania Twain

Most Read