ICBC encourages smart driving for holiday weekend

Easter long weekend approaching

Even though winter is now over, road conditions can still be challenging at this time of the year.

With unpredictable weather and increased traffic on our roads over the approaching long weekend, ICBC is asking drivers to drive smart and avoid distractions behind the wheel.

Every Easter long weekend, an average of four people are killed and 650 injured in 2,300 crashes in B.C. (Numbers are based on ICBC data 2011 to 2015. Fatality data based on police data 2011 to 2015. Easter long weekend is calculated from 6 p.m. the Thursday prior to Good Friday until midnight Easter Monday).

Regional statistics

On average, 490 people are injured in 1,500 crashes every year in the Lower Mainland over the Easter long weekend;

On average, 62 people are injured in 310 crashes every year in the Southern Interior;.

On average, 78 people are injured in 310 crashes every year on Vancouver Island;

On average, 20 people are injured in 130 crashes every year in the North Central region.

ICBC’s drive smart tips for Easter weekend:

Check your vehicle: If this is your first longer drive of the year, remember to check your engine oil, washer fluid, lights and inspect your vehicle tires, including the spare, to make sure they are in good condition and properly inflated.

Be prepared: Plan your route and visit drivebc.ca to check road and weather conditions before starting your trip. Be realistic about travel times over the long weekend and expect delays. Pack an emergency kit in your vehicle in case you get stuck or stranded.

Get some rest: Make sure you’re well rested before heading out on a long drive. Take breaks or switch drivers every two hours to avoid fatigue.

Slow down on wet roads: Allow yourself at least twice the normal braking distance on wet or slippery roads. Avoid driving through flooded or washed out roads.

Avoid distractions: Spring brings more cyclists, pedestrians and motorcyclists on our roads. Avoid distractions behind the wheel so you are alert and see all road users. Make important calls and send texts on your cell phone before you start your trip.

Watch for signs of wildlife: Animals may be feeding on plants near the roadside this spring. Slow down and use caution when you see wildlife on or near a highway, so you have time to react if an animal crosses your path.

Just Posted

Wedding rings and gold chain stolen from around Central Okanagan senior’s neck

Kelowna Mounties are warning the public after two thieves targeted a senior

Big White Ski Resort confident in avalanche prevention measures

Ski Patrol runs checks throughout day to promote safety on mountain

Kelowna Mounties injured in takedown of man with ‘blood running down his face’

A witness says that RCMP officers tackled a man in Glenmore

Find out more about the proposed Rutland fieldhouse

Central Okanagan Rugby Enthusiasts (CORE) join the invitation for April 3.

Crown drops one Vernon assault charge against Curtis Sagmoen

Curtis Wayne Sagmoen will still stand trial on one count of assault causing bodily harm in December.

After mosque attacks, New Zealand bans ‘military-style’ guns

The gunman killed 50 in a Christchurch mosque

Okanagan College accepting students to new Tourism Management Diploma

The program will be offered out of the Revelstoke campus this September

Demand for mental health services increasing with acceptance

Support organization sees growing waitlist, particularly for youth and families with children

Okanagan woman gets 14 days in jail for crash that sent motorcycle rider to hospital for months

The motorcycle rider had to relearn to walk after the 2017 crash

Festival planned for Easter weekend

Organizers preparing 10,000 eggs for hunt at Summerland’s Easter Egg-stravaganza

ICBC shifts to Alberta model, with higher rates, private insurers say

Minor injury cap, court restrictions take effect April 1 in B.C.

Kelowna Mounties injured in takedown of man with ‘blood running down his face’

A witness says that RCMP officers tackled a man in Glenmore

B.C., feds accused of ‘environmental racism’ over Site C, Mount Polley

Amnesty International Canada says governments failed to recognize threats to Indigenous peoples

Most Read