Involve Indigenous drug users in finding solutions to B.C.’s OD crisis: report

Dr. Mark Tyndall, BC Centre for Disease Control executive medical director, says drug users need access to non-toxic opioids

A report examining ways to reduce overdose deaths in British Columbia is calling for more involvement of Indigenous drug users, who are overrepresented in the crisis.

The BC Centre for Disease Control released the report after a meeting in June of 160 people including drug users, health and law enforcement personnel, government officials and the medical community.

It says people with past or present “lived experience” of substance use need to play a key role in developing and implementing realistic solutions to an epidemic that has killed thousands of people in B.C.

READ MORE: First Nations people in B.C. three times more likely to die of overdose

READ MORE: B.C.’s First Nations leaders suspect high rate of overdose deaths

The report says that as experts in the field, so-called peers are often the first responders to an overdose and should be paid appropriately for their contributions to research, service delivery and overdose prevention activities.

Dr. Mark Tyndall, the centre’s executive medical director, says drug users need access to non-toxic opioids to prevent overdoses in the first place.

Similar meetings in 2016 and 2017 resulted in expanded access to take-home kits of the overdose-reversing medication naloxone and more education for health care professionals on addiction medicine.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Highway 97 in Lake Country reopens after police incident near Airport Inn

Traffic was backed up on the highway for several hours

WATCH: Animal rights activist defends Monday’s Ribfest protest

Amy Soranno was one of seven activtists that chained themselves to a bank to protest Ribfest

Sponsors needed to help Kelowna families this season

Okanagan Boys and Girls Club “Adopt-A-Family” program kicks off for another year

Kelowna RCMP need 56 more officers by 2025: report

The additional officers would cost the city nearly $10 million

Central Okanagan Sports Hall of Fame welcomes 6 new inductees

Okanagan athletes and sports pioneers were added to the HOF Thursday

Get your head out of clouds, North Okanagan

Fall fog sticks around all day in northern portion of valley

Canucks erupt with 5 power-play goals in win over Nashville

Vancouver ends three-game slide with 6-3 triumph over Predators

65-million-year-old triceratops makes its debut in Victoria

Dino Lab Inc. is excavating the fossilized remains of a 65-million-year-old dinosaur

B.C. widow suing health authority after ‘untreatable’ superbug killed her husband

New Public Agency Health report puts Canadian death toll at 5,400 in 2018

Changes to B.C. building code address secondary suites, energy efficiency

Housing Minister Selina Robinson says the changes will help create more affordable housing

Security guard at Kamloops music festival gets three years for sexually assaulting concertgoer

Shawn Christopher Gray walked the woman home after she became seperated from her friends, court heard

Keremeos Fire Department acquires new truck

Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen approves fire truck purchases for Keremeos, Willowbrook

Most Read