It’s going to be hot, hot, hot

A special hot weather statement has been issued for the entire Okanagn – Shuswap region

UPDATE: JUNE 24, 7 pm

Environment Canada’s special hot weather statement remains in effect throughout the weekend. For further details, read the story below.

——

ORIGINAL: JUNE 23, 11 AM

A strong weather system is moving in this afternoon predicted to push weekend temperatures into the mid 30s, and prompting an Environment Canada warning.

A special hot weather statement has been issued for the entire Okanagan – Shuswap region and the entire Southern half of the province.

Environment Canada reports a strong upper ridge of high pressure is building over the province that will result in the brief heat wave over southwest B.C.

“It’s going to be hot,” says meteorologist Alyssa Charbonneau. “For the Okanagan Valley we are look at 35 degrees, highs of 34 C in the Shuswap on Sunday.”

Temperatures will peak this weekend with maximums of at least 32 degrees, reaching the mid to high 30s throughout the Okanagan Valley.

Meteorologists expect that a few daily record high temperatures will likely be broken with this weekend’s heat wave.

As this hot weather system passes, temperatures will noticably dip on Monday.

“This is one of our first heat waves this year,” added Charbonneau. “As such, we have issued a special weather statement for most of Southern B.C.”

The statement was issued as these extreme heat waves can be risky for young children, pregnant women, older adults, people with chronic illnesses and people working or exercising outdoors.

“The statement is just to remind people to take care during this very hot weather,” said Charbonneau. “Fortunately the heat wave will not be too long lived.”

After things cool off on Monday, Charbonneau expects daily highs to still remain slightly above average at about 28 C.

“We’re also seeing some cloud, a chance of showers or thunderstorms, moving back into the forecast after Tuesday, so some relief from the real heat.”

Meteorologists ask those at risk to watch for the effects of heat illness: swelling, rash, cramps, fainting, heat exhaustion, heat stroke and the worsening of some health conditions.

Drink plenty of water even before you feel thirsty and stay in a cool place.

Never leave people or pets inside a parked vehicle.

For more information;

  • Check back here for health and safety updates.
  • For information on heat-related illness, call HealthLinkBC at 811.
  • You can also contact your local government to find out what services (such as air-conditioned buildings and public splash parks) are available in your area.


 

@carmenweld
carmen.weld@bpdigital.ca

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