Kelowna council to take on car culture

“Municipalities have the ability to influence and lead GHG reductions …”

Car culture will be the focus of Kelowna city council today when Community Climate Action Plan is up for discussion.

Record levels of spring precipitation led to historic flooding of Okanagan Lake, Mission Creek and Mill Creek, affected some 3,200 residents in the community and that was followed by one of the hottest and driest July and August on record, which led to a devastating wildfire season and the community blanketed in smoke, reads the report to council by Tracy Guidi, the city’s sustainability coordinator

As global greenhouse gas emissions grow, these types of extreme weather events are expected to occur more regularly.

“The release of greenhouse gas emissions and the resulting impacts on the climate have consequences for Kelowna’s economies, ecosystems and social well-being. Municipalities have the ability to influence and lead GHG reductions through land use planning, transportation options, building requirements and waste services,” writes Guidi.

RELATED: MAYOR’S CLIMATE COMMENTS RANKLE READERS

“Moving towards a low carbon community helps create a city that Kelowna residents want to live in, as heard through Imagine Kelowna, a city that takes leadership on climate, transportation, urban sprawl, housing and the environment.”

Some of the measures the city can take to meet that aim, writes Guidi in the plan, targets cars, energy, transportation, and urban sprawl.

Policies that help the city meet their goals are already underway, and included the pedestrian and bicycle master plan and improving the public transit system.

Actions recommended include developing a community wide electric vehicle strategy and updating the zoning bylaw to restrict drive-thrus for food, financial institutions, pharmacy and liquor.

The report also recommends implementing an anti-idling bylaw and the OCP aim of “work towards a pricing structure where the cost of parking for an hour at a municipality facility exceeds the price of a single transit trip.”

RELATED: CITIZEN SURVEY SAYS…

Ideas that will be investigated further include options to integrate alternative fuels into city vehicles and options for a regional fuel tax to support the expansion and improvement of the regional transit system and/or alternative forms of transportation.

Based on the provincial Community Energy and Emissions Inventory from 2012, Kelowna’s community greenhouse gas emissions are over 642,000 tonnes, with 55 per cent of emissions coming from vehicles, 36 per cent from buildings and nine per cent from waste.

These emissions represent a 3.5 per cent decrease from the 2007 baseline (equivalent to 12 per cent per capita reduction). Implementing the recommended actions over the next five years, it is estimated that the community will be able to achieve an absolute GHG reduction of four per cent below 2007 levels by 2023.

To report a typo, email: edit@kelownacapnews.com.



kmichaels@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

 

Just Posted

Protected bike lane, multi-use bridge to improve Kelowna cycling network

Construction begins next week to improve the city’s cycling network.

West Coast Poke bowls coming to Kelowna’s downtown

Pacific Poke is opening a location on Bernard Avenue

Concert to conquer cancer comes to Vernon, Kelowna

All proceeds go to the B.C. Cancer Foundation’s Childhood Cancer Research Initiative.

Kelowna petting zoo closing its gates

Hoof Prints Barnyard announced, Tuesday night, it will be closing

Kelowna, West Kelowna high in vehicle break-ins

52 vehicles break-ins in downtown Kelowna alone in four week period, according to Crime Stoppers

The UBC Innovation Library has helped over 1,100 students since opening in 2015

Students across B.C. can access their academic resources at the UBC Innovation Library

Beloved Okanagan-Skaha school district champion dies

Bruce Johnson was a teacher, principal and long-serving school trustee in Penticton

’Full worm super moon’ to illuminate B.C. skies on first day of spring

Spring has sprung, a moon named in honour of thawing soil marks final super moon until 2020

Concert to conquer cancer comes to Vernon, Kelowna

All proceeds go to the B.C. Cancer Foundation’s Childhood Cancer Research Initiative.

Police lock down part of Armstrong after ‘live grenade’ discovered

An ordnance believed to be a grenade found on Smith Drive between Dairy Queen and Anchor Inn Pub

Dutch police question new suspect in deadly tram shooting

Police are looking for additional suspects in the shooting

Starbucks to test recyclable cups, redesign stores in B.C., U.S. cities

The company also said it plans to redesign its stores as it adapts to increasing mobile pick-up and delivery orders

In pre-election budget, Liberals boost infrastructure cash to cities, broadband

The budget document says the Liberals have approved more than 33,000 projects, worth about $19.9 billion in federal financing

‘That’s a load of crap’: Dog poop conspiracy spreads in White Rock

Allegation picked up steam through a Facebook page run by a city councillor

Most Read