Flooding caused damage along several creeks in Kelowna last spring. Scotty Creek (above) was among the creeks in Kelowna that spilled its banks. The city plans to work to repair damage to both Bellevue and Mill Creeks this spring. —Image: Capital News file

Flooding caused damage along several creeks in Kelowna last spring. Scotty Creek (above) was among the creeks in Kelowna that spilled its banks. The city plans to work to repair damage to both Bellevue and Mill Creeks this spring. —Image: Capital News file

Kelowna crews still repairing flood damage from 2017

Work along Bellevue and Mill Creeks will take place this spring says the city

The City of Kelowna says residential of properties along Bellevue and Mill Creeks may see an increase in activity this spring as crews work to restore damaged creek channels.

“Crews will be working to remove vegetation, debris, and damage as a result of last year’s floods,” said Fred Schaad, project manager with the city. “We have all the professionals lined up and the necessary plans to stabilize and restore channel flow capacity are in place. We’re just waiting for approval from the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.”

Record setting rainfall in 2017, combined with snow melt, saturated ground and high groundwater levels resulted in major flooding in Mill Creek with considerable damage to Bellevue Creek and the Okanagan Lake foreshore.

Completion of the channel capacity restoration works may take several months and will be slow going and very challenging says the city because of the highly urbanized condition of the area and limited access for crews and equipment. However, the work, when completed, will help to mitigate potential future flooding says the city.

These channel capacity restoration projects are part of the estimated $10.7 million 2017 Flood Recovery plan, which is 80 per cent funded by Emergency Management B.C. The plan includes the restoration of damage along a number of creeks, as well as lakeshore parks and other public spaces.

As for this spring, the city says the potential for flooding exists this year—as it does every year—and property owners living near creeks, streams, low-lying areas and the lakeshore are responsible for having a plan in place to protect their properties.

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