Kelowna deputy city manager calls it quits

Paul Macklem retired from city hall Friday after nearly 28 years.

Paul Macklem

Kelowna’s deputy city manager has called it a career in local government after nearly 28 years at city hall.

Paul Macklem, is heading to Victoria to become the executive director of the Government Finance Officer’s Association of B.C.

“I figured it was just time,” said Macklem of his decision to leave city hall after nearly three decades. His last day was March 11.

Macklem said the new job was not the reason he decided to leave the city. He had planned to retire and was then offered the GFOA job.

Macklem, 60, served in a number of senior management positions during his time the City of Kelowna, starting in 1988 as it budget manager, then becoming its deputy finance director, finance director,  general manager of corporate sustainability and finally deputy city manager.

Prior to being named deputy city manager, Macklem was seconded to run the Central Okanagan Regional district for a year in 2012, as interim administrator.

When he returned to city hall in 2013, he was promoted to be second-in-command following a corporate structuring.

As part of the city’s senior management team, Macklem oversaw the operations of the airport, regional services, business development and the fire department. His strategic services department was also responsible for projects that help the city raise revenue from sources other than taxation. One of its biggest successes was the $55-million sale of the city’s electric utility to Fortis B.C.

On Friday, his last day on the job, Macklem’s colleagues both past and present held a lunch for him to say good bye.

“There have been a ton of highlights,” Macklem told the Kelowna Capital News before lunch. “But oveall it’s been a privilege to serve Kelowna residents all these years. I know that sounds corny, but it’s true.”

He said working for the city made him part of a team, a team he was quick to credit for the success over the years.

Macklem said when he came to Kelowna in 1988, the city was very different than it is today. It’s population was about half what it is now but was growing quickly.

The city grappled with its pace of growth during the mid-1990s when it was the fastest growing municipality in the country.

In the years since, Kelowna has seen a great deal of development, changes he feels have helped make the city more beautiful.

Macklem’s legacy will likely be the role he played in developing Kelowna’s finances over the years.

Starting when he was finance director, the city has been recognized for its annual budget and handling of its finances by the larger Government Finance Officers Association of Canada and the U.S. each year for the last 12 years.

 

 

Just Posted

Okanagan Sun tackle Chilliwack Saturday in BCFC action

The Sun will be looking for revenge at home after Corn Huskers beat them 22-18 earlier in season

Okanagan tech industry booming, contributes over $1.6 billion to regional economy

New study shows Okanagan tech sector contributes over $1.6 billion to regional economy

Kelowna church closes and makes room for Starbright

Starbright Children’s Development Centre meeting need for space with major real estate purchase

Black Mountain / sntsk‘il’ntən Regional Park starts to take shape

Student volunteers from three local schools work on trail building project

Kelowna’s Pleasure Painters to host day of art

The annual art sale will take place Oct. 20

Pavement Patty slows drivers near Rutland Elementary

New survey reveals unsafe school zones during 2018 back-to-school week

‘Like an Alfred Hitchcock movie’: Birds fall dead from the sky in B.C. city

Raptor expert says he’s never seen it happen anywhere in the Lower Mainland

Canada signs global pact to help rid world’s oceans of abandoned fishing gear

The federal Fisheries Minister says it’s a ‘critical issue’

GOP pushing forward for Kavanaugh, accuser wants ‘fairness’

Kavanaugh has denied al allegations of sexual misconduct

Tent city campers now allowed to stay in B.C. provincial park

Contrary to earlier reports, Ministry of Environment says there is no deadline for campers to leave Greater Victoria camp site

Bus company vies to replace Greyhound in Kamloops to Vancouver, Kelowna

Alberta-based Ebus applies to the Passenger Transportation Board to replace Greyhound

Former VP of lululemon joins B.C. cannabis cultivation facility

Kerry Biggs will be the Chief Financial Officer of True Leaf, in Lumby

Summerland retrofits its streetlights

Conversion to LED streetlights expected to save more than $72,000 a year

Could cannabis help keep people in B.C. on treatment for opioid addiction?

People on opioid agonist treatment face lower risks of overdosing, BC Centre on Substance Use says

Most Read