photo:conributed

photo:conributed

Kelowna to be home of green self storage facility

The building will be the first of its kind in North America

Downtown Kelowna will soon be home to a cutting-edge, green self-storage facility that will be the first of its kind in North America and one of 16 projects in Canada to participate in the Zero Carbon Building Pilot Program.

EcoLock Kelowna, a for-profit commercial development that combines self-storage and a co-workspace facility, will be a five-floor, 112,000-square foot building that will generate 105 per cent of its electricity through the use of on-site solar panels. The facility will not be attached to the natural gas grid.

“Buildings are the number one producer of greenhouse gasses in North America, and this project is raising the bar for sustainable development,” said Don Redden, CEO of Ulmus Development Ltd., the parent company of EcoLock Kelowna. “With 2.5 billion square feet of self-storage facilities in North America, many of the facilities are low-density, unproductive spaces that don’t contribute to the fabric of a neighborhood. EcoLock Kelowna will demonstrate that there are greener, more customer-focused alternatives to enable dense, walkable urban living and creative storage solutions.”

RELATED: Cap rent increases at inflation rate, B.C. task force recommends

The internal building walls will sequester carbon, using Just BioFiber blocks made in Canada from waste hemp stock. Each Just BioFiber block stores 6.5 kilograms of carbon. These blocks replace a significant amount of steel and concrete, leading a continuous de-carbonization of materials over time. EcoLock Kelowna will be one of the largest building-specific ‘sinks’ of sequestered atmospheric CO2 in the world. The building will also collect, filter and reuse rainwater in a 62,000-litre tank, located under the building, for all planting irrigation.

The building, located at the corner of Ellis Street and Bay Avenue in Kelowna, is designed by international architecture and planning firm McLennan Design and its founder Jason F. McLennan. McLennan, a Canadian and recipient of the prestigious Buckminster Fuller prize, is the creator of the Living Building Challenge and is considered one of the most influential individuals in the green building movement today.

RELATED: David Coulson, Designing Homes For Life

“EcoLock Kelowna is pursuing the most stringent green building standard in the world through the Living Building Challenge,” said McLennan. “Most commercial development has not yet caught up with the trends toward high performance sustainable design, and I believe this project will help lead the way.”

EcoLock will combine self-storage with its Werkright co-workspace area that will be a venue for self-employed and local business people who require a creative professional work and meeting area, and for out-of-town business people who belong to the Werkright family.

“EcoLock and Ulmus Developments are excited to be bringing this innovative project to Kelowna to demonstrate how B.C. companies are on the leading edge of combating climate change with creative environmental solutions,” added Redden.

EcoLock Kelowna is entirely privately-funded and not dependent on contributions from governments or foundations. It has been approved by Kelowna City Council and is scheduled to open to the public next summer.

“The City of Kelowna is committed to building connected, strong neighborhoods and urban centres that help us limit our greenhouse gas emissions,” said Kelowna Mayor Colin Basran. “We also have corporate goals to reduce GHGs in City-owned buildings, so it’s great to see a company like EcoLock come to Kelowna to build one of the greenest buildings in North America.”

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@KelownaCapNews
newstips@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A nurse performs a test on a patient at a drive-in COVID-19 clinic in Montreal, on Wednesday, October 21, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson)
30 new COVID-19 cases, five more deaths in Interior Health

This brings the total number of cases to 7,271 since testing began

West Kelowna City Hall on Cameron Road. (File photo)
Rose Valley water treatment facility to cost less than planned

The contract of $45.1 million was awarded to developer Maple Reinders Constructors Ltd .

Crash on Enterprise Way, Feb 23. (Jen Zielinski, Black Press Media)
Tuesday evening’s commute stalled by 3 vehicle collision

The incident backed up traffic on Enterprise Way at Dilworth Drive

A $3,000 donation from the Gary Bennett Family Fund will go towards baby products for families in need. (Central Okanagan Food Bank)
Okanagan charity donates $3,000 to support young families

The Gary Bennett Family Fund donated to Central Okanagan Food Bank

Project rendering of Hadgraft Wilson Place (CNW Group/Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation)
68-unit affordable housing complex coming downtown Kelowna

The six-storey complex located on Fuller Ave is set to be completed by fall 2022

Dr. Bonnie Henry talk about the next steps in B.C.'s COVID-19 Immunization Plan during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday, January 22, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
456 new COVID-19 cases in B.C., 2 deaths

Since January 2020, 78,278 have tested positive for the novel coronavirus in B.C.

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)
Vaccinating essential workers before seniors in B.C. could save lives: experts

A new study says the switch could also save up to $230 million in provincial health-care costs

The late Michael Gregory, 57, is accused of sexually exploiting six junior high students between 1999 and 2005. (Pixabay)
Former Alberta teacher accused of sexually assaulting students found dead in B.C.

Mounties say Michael Gregory’s death has been deemed ‘non-suspicious’

According to a new poll, a majority of Canadians want to see illicit drugs decriminalized. (THE ASSOCIATED PRESS)
Majority of Canadians think it’s high time to decriminalize illicit drugs: poll

More than two-times the B.C. residents know someone who died from an overdose compared to rest of Canada

Ranchero Deep Creek firefighters respond to a blaze involving two adjacent structures at a property off of Deep Creek Road on Sunday, Feb. 21. The buildings were believed to have been used as part of a cannabis growing operation, and RCMP are investigating. (Sean Coubrough/CSRD photo)
Ranchero Deep Creek firefighters respond to a blaze involving two adjacent structures at a property off of Deep Creek Road on Sunday, Feb. 21. The buildings were believed to have been used as part of a cannabis growing operation, and RCMP are investigating. (Sean Coubrough/CSRD photo)
Shuswap firefighters responding to structure blaze find cannabis grow operation

RCMP investigating, attempting to track down owner of property

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Interior Health officially declared a COVID-19 outbreak at Creekside Landing in Vernon on Jan. 3, which was followed by the first death from the virus 10 days later. (Kaigo photo)
COVID outbreak over at Vernon care home

Creekside Landing cleared of coronavirus, despite additional death in last day

(Stock photo)
EDITORIAL: The freedom to read

Books have been challenged many times in the past

Most Read