Residents took part in the 4th annual Peace Walk on Sunday in Kelowna. - Image: Mark Dreger Residents took part in the 4th annual Peace Walk on Sunday in Kelowna. - Image: Mark Dreger

Kelowna walks for peace

Residents gather to spread a message of inclusivity and peace

By Mark Dreger

Kelowna residents gathered at Stuart Park Sunday to participate in the 4th annual Peace Walk.

In honor of the 20th anniversary of the Season for Nonviolence, locals took part in one of hundreds of walks across the world to create an awareness of nonviolent principles, and practice as a powerful way to heal, transform, and empower local lives and communities.

“It’s about celebrating peace and the practises and principles of nonviolent living,” said Nadene Rogers, the chair for the 2018 Season for Nonviolence. “It happens in I think about 500 cities around the world during a specific 64 day period.”

The 64 days mark the commemoration of Mahatma Gandhi’s death on January 30, 1948 and Martin Luther King Jr.’s death on April 4, 1968. This year marks the 70th and 50th anniversaries of the deaths of Gandhi and King respectively.

“It’s an opportunity for people to come together and be for something that’s a lot greater than who they are as individuals in their own lives,” Rogers said. “It brings us out of ourselves as individuals and it brings us into this collective mindset or consciousness: A feeling of unity and spiritual community with people you’ve never met before, standing for a cause that everyone—despite the differences in faith or cultural backgrounds—believes in and wants and desires.”

The Give Peace a Voice event prides itself that they are inter-faith, inter-generational, and multi-cultural with their slogan, “being for something and against nothing.”

“It’s really a deep statement,” Rogers said. “Metaphysically speaking when you’re for something you can’t be against anything. If you’re really for everything then you can’t be divided and be against something. If we’re for peace does that mean we’re for war? Well, we’re for the possibility and the solution that war can bring. Would we choose to use war as a way to bring peace? No. But if war is existing, what within it is solution-based and how can we move forward in a peaceful manner from there?”

As the walk began to move away from the park and to Bernard Avenue, participants led the walk with a sign from the Centre for Spiritual Living commemorating Gandhi, King, and the Dalai Lama with the quote, “Turning the Global Tides.” The marchers also sang the lyrics to John Lennon’s 1971 song Imagine.

“I have invited a lot of different spiritual leaders to attend this year,” Rogers said. “It’s the first time we’ve really reached out to really start understanding and listening to them, (learning) what inclusivity really means, and what their traditions and observances might ask of us to do differently in order for them to feel comfortable being who they are.”

While on the walk, locals placed Peace Rocks where they felt the city could use more peace, and handed the rocks out to individuals that might not have a smile on their face.

“The route is a lot bigger and we are trying to have a presence more in the downtown core where a lot of business happens, a lot of decisions are made for the City of Kelowna, and where there’s a lot of people gathered who are temporarily without a roof over their head and food in their tummies.”

Rogers concludes with a quote from Denis Waitley: There are two primary choices in life: To accept conditions as they exist, or accept the responsibility for changing them.

“Today we take responsibility.”

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@KelownaCapNews
newstips@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

West Kelowna reopens beach volleyball, new pickleball courts

The City of West Kelowna is asking residents to maintain safe distancing

RDCO announces spring poetry contest winners

The district received 70 poems starting from May 1

City prepares for high water at Mission Creek

Property owners are being advised to prepare for flooding

Mother duck and babies rescued from Highway 97 in Lake Country

The mother and nine ducklings were taken to Duck Lake

Non-food vendors coming back to Kelowna farmers’ market this weekend

The Kelowna Farmers’ and Crafters’ Market is welcoming back several artisans on Saturday

Only four new COVID-19 cases, 228 active across B.C.

Health officials watching as activities ramp up

Parts of the TCT through Princeton will open to motorized vehicles Monday

Parts of the KVR trail through Princeton will open for motorized vehicles… Continue reading

Feds looking at ways to reunite families amid COVID-19 border restrictions with U.S.

Some families with members of dual-citizenship have become separated due to the pandemic

Condition in kids with possible COVID-19 link being studied in Canada

This month, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued an alert to doctors about MIS-C

North Okanagan farmers’ markets excited to welcome artisans back amid COVID-19

Provincial health officer announced non-food items to return to markets this weekend

‘I knew what he wanted’: Kootenay man spends hours in tree as black bear patrols below

Francis Levasseur is no stranger to the outdoors, but a recent run-in with a bear caused quite a scare

COVID cancelled their wedding plans, so they married on a BC mountaintop

Ceremony was live streamed to friends and family around the world

Chef brings farm-to-table approach to new Shuswap restaurant

Darren Bezanson opening Bistro 1460 at Hilltop Inn

Trudeau acknowledges racial unrest in U.S.; ‘We also have work to do in Canada’

‘Anti-black racism, racism, is real; it’s in the United States, but it’s also in Canada,’ Trudeau says

Most Read