Volunteer Jan Robson checks on a pair of green-wing macaws at a warehouse where 95 birds awaiting adoption are being housed by the Greyhaven Exotic Bird Sanctuary, in Vancouver, B.C., on Jan. 23, 2018. (Darryl Dyck / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Loud, loving parrots at Vancouver sanctuary can stay for now

A group of parrots awaiting adoption in Vancouver can stay put for now, after a lease on a warehouse full of the chattering birds was extended.

A group of parrots awaiting adoption in Vancouver can stay put for now, after a lease on a warehouse full of the chattering birds was extended.

Jan Robson, spokeswoman for the Greyhaven Exotic Bird Sanctuary, said the property is up for development, but permits have yet to be approved, so a lease that was set to expire on Feb. 28 will now be in place until the end of April.

That will buy time while another site is sought for 88 moluccan cockatoos, amazons and macaws needing forever homes, Robson said.

The sanctuary received 170 parrots in July of 2016. The birds were among 600 rescued from the World Parrot Refuge in Coombs, B.C., on Vancouver Island after a woman who operated the facility died.

Some of the parrots have found new homes in other provinces, including an umbrella cockatoo named Chewy, who two weeks ago ended up in Nova Scotia with his “new momma,” Robson said.

“She has been sending us videos and always has hearts all over them. She’s head over heels in love with him. She came to see him on a Saturday, and by seven o’clock they were both on a plane.”

Another bird named Colton has moved to Calgary, where his new owner changed his name to Maverick.

RELATED: Bob and his parrot buddies living in B.C. warehouse need forever homes

“She sent several videos as well,” Robson said. “The most recent one was of him singing along to a country western song. It’s just hysterical. He’s got all the bells and whistles in his cage, and new toys, so he looks like he’s living the life.”

Anyone wanting to adopt a parrot must undergo rigorous checks to ensure they’re keen on putting up with the noisy, attention-loving birds.

“When it’s distance adoptions like that we either know someone who checks out the home at that end or we’ve done some Skype checking to get a sense, and of course, checking references. Then they have to come out and meet the bird.”

A family on British Columbia’s Gulf Islands is also ready to adopt a parrot, Robson said.

A particularly loud peach-coloured moluccan cockatoo named Bob has a special bond with Robson and tends to be fond of women.

“He has more female attention than anyone can reasonably expect in a lifetime,” she said of Bob, who recently became the sanctuary’s star when a group of fawning female veterinarian technicians showed up.

“He was in his element,” Robson said, adding that Bob has been a hard sell because of his jet-engine decibel level.

She said that while parrots are a lovable lot, anyone wanting to adopt one should know they live up to 80 years and have a penchant for destroying furniture with their beaks.

Camille Bains, The Canadian Press

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