Meat protest touts the vegan and tofu lifestyle

Usually people complain when they’re looked at like a piece of meat, but participants of a traveling PETA protest encouraged ogling during their Kelowna stop.

Staging their own version of macabre street theatre Wednesday on Abbott Street were supporters of the “meat is murder” campaign with PETA (People for Ethical Treatment of Animals).

Staging their own version of macabre street theatre Wednesday on Abbott Street were supporters of the “meat is murder” campaign with PETA (People for Ethical Treatment of Animals).

Usually people complain when they’re looked at like a piece of meat, but participants of a traveling PETA protest encouraged ogling during their Kelowna stop.

“If (passersby) see me like a piece of bloody meat maybe they’ll realize that the animals they eat are, like myself, living, breathing creatures that have feelings and can love,” said David Matthews, who was lying on the sidewalk Tuesday afternoon, wrapped up in cellophane, doused in blood-red raspberry sauce and tagged like a steak.

He and PETA cohort Emily Lavender aren’t just revelling in the macabre—tales of castrations, live disembowelment and beak or teeth removal, were among the details they delivered to curious onlookers—with their “meat is murder” tour.

Outside steakhouses, butcher shops and abattoirs, they are also spreading vegan tidings.

“It’s easier than ever before to be a vegan,” said Lavender, outside a steakhouse on Abbott Street, across from City Park.

“Basically, you can eat whatever you want to, just substitute in soy products and it’s healthier.”

Lavender would know, being as she only recently converted to veganism after watching a Paul McCartney documentary that laid out age-old practices in factory slaughterhouses.

“As soon as I saw the video footage, I knew I didn’t want to be part of a violent industry,” she said of her conversion.

While it worked for her, it didn’t seem to be an easy sell to everyone who passed by their display.

“I love hamburgers,” yelled the occupants of a truck that zoomed by the small group. Another woman came by to point out the benefits of cow’s milk.

Others just smiled, snapped pictures and took the vegan guide Lavender was handing out.

Overall, however, the four local women who augmented the protest by holding up PETA signs said the response was largely positive.

“They’ll go home with this in mind,” said Kylee Fournier.

“It’s planting a seed,” added Raeanna Sam.

For more information on PETA and its causes, check out the website www.peta.org.

 

Kelowna Capital News

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