Nova Scotia legislature passes presumed consent law for organ donation

The act is not expected to be proclaimed as law for a period of 12 to 18 months

The Nova Scotia legislature has unanimously passed legislation that presumes consent for organ donation, becoming the first jurisdiction in North America to pass such legislation.

The Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act was passed as legislators wrapped up their spring sitting on Friday.

However, the act is not expected to be proclaimed as law for a period of 12 to 18 months to allow time for planning, public education and training for health-care workers.

Under the act, all adults in Nova Scotia would be considered potential organ donors unless they opt out.

Families will continue to be consulted about their loved ones’ wishes, while those under 19 and people without decision-making capacity will only be considered as donors if a parent, guardian or alternate decision-maker opts them in.

READ MORE: 3,300 British Columbians register as organ donors in six days time

Premier Stephen McNeil says the goal is to ensure there are more potential organ donors in order to save lives.

“I am grateful for the support our government has received from Nova Scotians as together, we become leaders in North America on the issue of presumed consent for organ and tissue donation,” McNeil said in a statement.

“We are committed to doing better for our fellow citizens awaiting life-saving transplants, and I look forward to collaborating with Nova Scotians as we work toward proclaiming the legislation next year.”

Earlier this week, Dr. Stephen Beed, who heads the province’s transplant program, told a legislature committee that within five years of the legislation’s implementation he expects Nova Scotia would see a 30 per cent increase in organ donations. Beed added that he wouldn’t be surprised if that number increased by as much as 50 per cent.

He said steps will be put in place to ensure the opt-out provisions are clear.

According to the province, 21 Nova Scotians became organ donors in 2018, while 110 people donated tissues such as corneas and heart valves.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

The Who’s iconic rock opera coming to Kelowna

Theatre Kelowna Society celebrates 70th season this fall with Tommy

Goalies seal Penticton Vees win in exhibition game versus Warriors

The Penticton Vees and West Kelowna Warriors in BCHL exhibition action

Meet your RibFest BBQers

RibFest Kelowna runs Aug. 23, 24 and 25

Lake Country residents would like to swim

Survey shows 55 per cent of respondents favour a community pool

Indoor Okanagan soccer league expands in 2nd year

The Okanagan Premier League (OPL) returns for indoor action in October

Down the Rabbit Hole in Kelowna

Down The Rabbit Hole, is a story based on Alice in Wonderland told through dance and acrobatics.

Down the Rabbit Hole in Kelowna

Down The Rabbit Hole, is a story based on Alice in Wonderland told through dance and acrobatics.

Concerts, workshops and more will be held in Summerland Aug 24 to Sept. 1

The Ryga Arts Festival, which runs Aug. 24 to Sept. 1 in… Continue reading

Police watchdog investigating two officers after Langley teen’s suspected overdose

According to IIO, two officers were deployed to help Carson Crimeni but did not locate him before he died

B.C. father tells judge he did not kill his young daughters

Andrew Berry pleaded not guilty to the December 2017 deaths

Judge seeks compassion for man caught on moped

Defendant says ICBC told him he could drive

The Ice Queen of the blues coming to the South Okanagan

Award winning blues artist Sue Foley coming to the Dream Café

UPDATED: Kelly Ellard gets day parole extended for six more months, overnight leave

Kelly Ellard was convicted of killing 14-year-old Reena Virk in 1997

Most Read