file photo

Poetizer looks to change the way social media used

The platform allows everyone to become a poet

A new social media platform, Poetizer looks to provide an alternative to current social media platforms.

Through research from Hill Holiday, a U.S. communications agency, Poetizer has concluded that the interest of millennials in traditional social media sites is decreasing.

“The research has shown that 34 per cent of respondents from Generation Z have deleted their accounts on traditional social media platforms and nearly 64 per cent are taking a temporary break. One of the main reasons for their departure is the negative influence of social media on their mental well-being, which has been monitored by the British Royal Society of Public Health. Instagram and Snapchat incur the highest risk of mental health-related impacts,” said a representative of Poetzer in a press release.

“What’s interesting is that both these social media platforms are visual and cause the feeling of inferiority and anxiety in young people,” said Shirley Cramer, director of RSPH in a press release.

RELATED: The power of social media puts a roof over a Lake Country man’s head

Poetizer is a platform based on poetry and the written word and others an enjoyable alternative for a large number of users. “Poetizer is creating a space for poetry lovers across the globe that share the same de- sires and values, like freedom of speech, authenticity and the love of poetry as a form of self-expression. We believe that the platform will interest even those who don’t write poetry themselves,” said Lukáš Sedláček, co-founder and managing director of Poetizer.

“More and more people don’t feel free to be fully themselves on current social media, as they feel pressured to live up to other people’s expectations,” he said in a press release.

According to Sedláček, Poetizer should serve as a safe space for the global poetry community and represent the voices of those who want to be heard in society.

RELATED: Social media leaves anyone with an opinion vulnerable to scorched-earth attacks

Poetry is growing in popularity thanks to modern poets on social media, especially on Instagram. Among the best-known are American poet R. M Drake, Australian poet Lang Leav and the queen of instapoets, the Canadian-Indian poet Rupi Kaur. Her first poetry collection Milk and Honey sold more than 2.5 million books. She maintained her position on the New York Times1 Bestseller List for over a year.

The ‘instapoets’ are taking both social media and the publishing market by storm. Between the years 2015 and 2017, sales of poetry in the US increased by 21 per cent and it has become the fastest growing segment in the book market. According to some poets, Instagram is no longer enough for them as a platform.

“I don’t want to only write poems that fit into a square-sized image on Instagram,” said Danez Smith, poet for the American National Book Award in a press release.

RELATED: Social media leaves anyone with an opinion vulnerable to scorched-earth attacks

“When we were creating Poetizer, we primarily listened to the wishes and needs of poets. Communi- ty of people interested in poetry is rapidly rising globally and they deserve their own social network, built on their wishes and with no limits to their artistic expression,” said Johana Sedláčková Vamberská, co-founder and CEO of Poetizer in a press release.

Founded in 2017, Poetizer is a startup that was born out of the Sedláček spouses’ love of poetry. The global organic success of the mobile application surprised them and motivated them to continue to develop the project. Poetizer is a now website and a fully integrated platform for iOS and Android. Currently, it serves the poetry community in over 120 countries all over the world. Among the key features and advantages of the platform are the option for the user to choose anonymity, a text editor with detailed editing options, the ability to choose a minimalist design that supports creativity and the ability to create your own poem collection.

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@KelownaCapNews
newstips@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

2018 annual report: Crime increased in almost every statistical category in Lake Country

Report states there were 617 offences in 2018; almost 100 more than 2017

Trans event at Pride gives marginalized youth a community, says director

The Trans Youth March and Social participants rallied on Thursday, June 20.

Chance of showers and thunderstorm for Okanagan-Shuswap-Similkameen

Mostly cloudy day for the Okanagan-Shuswap and Similkameen regions

Lake Country brain injury rehab community celebrates 10 years

CONNECT recognized staff and residents at an anniversary celebration June 21

Kootnekoff: WCB review wants your comments

Filed a Workers’ Compensation Board claim within the past 15 years?

Air Canada reviewing how crew left sleeping passenger on parked plane

In a Facebook post, the woman said she woke up ‘all alone’ on a ‘cold dark’ aircraft

Crash near Okanagan elementary school investigated

RCMP officer watches driver hit concrete barrier and then fence at school

Crews fight wildfire along Sea-to-Sky Highway

A cause has not been determined, although a downed power line is suspected

Two mudslides close Seymour Arm road in North Shuswap, no one injured

Slides hit Seymour Arm Main Forest Service Road halfway between St. Ives and Seymour Arm

“Our community has had its heart broken”: South Okanagan celebrates life of David Kampe

Community and families members who knew Kampe give tearful addresses

Lower lake levels could create bumper crop of invasive milfoil

The CSRD board received an update on efforts to suppress the invasive aquatic plant

PHOTOS: Event marks one year since soccer team rescued from Thai cave

Nine players and coach took part in marathon and bike event to help improve conditions at cave

Vernon and Sicamous cannabis stores get provincial nod

Spiritleaf in Vernon will be the Okanagan’s first cannabis store.

Rock climber dies after fall at Stawamus Chief in Squamish

The man had fallen about 30 metres while climbing in the Grand Wall area

Most Read