Princeton ATV rider slapped with numerous charges after complaint of near miss on the KVR

Princeton ATV rider slapped with numerous charges after complaint of near miss on the KVR

‘I would never defend actions like that’ - Ed Vermette, Princeton ATV Club president

A Princeton man is facing numerous charges under the Motor Vehicle Act after a visitor to the area claimed his family was nearly run down by an ATV.

The incident occurred Sunday July 5, at about 8 p.m., according to RCMP Sgt. Rob Hughes.

A man called police and said he and his family were walking on the KVR trail, through the tunnel, when an ATV drove towards them at high speed.

The man told police his children were almost hit by the vehicle, which he estimated was travelling between 60 and 70 kilometres an hour, said Hughes.

When RCMP investigated, they discovered an outdoor party in the area, where there was underage drinking. Then an ATV, which matched the description of the one provided, arrived on the scene with a passenger.

Hughes said the driver, a 28-year-old local man, was not licensed, and not wearing a helmet.

He was charged with “multiple Motor Vehicle Act infractions,” including impaired driving, said Hughes.

The man was issued a 90-day license suspension, and the ATV was impounded for 30 days.

The KVR through Princeton was opened for motorized vehicles June 1, 2020, after approval from council and a lengthy consultation process.

Related: Parts of the KVR through Princeton will open to motorized vehicles Monday

Previously the trail was for non-motorized use only, and the issue was key in the 2018 municipal election.

Ed Vermette is president of the Princeton ATV Club, and also chair of the committee that made recommendations on opening the trail to council. He told the Spotlight the incident is “a serious complaint. I would never defend actions like that.”

The trail is open to off-road vehicles for a one-year trial, and he stressed the rules — along with the 15 km/h speed limit — are well posted.

“We worked for four years to get it to where it is now,” he said. “It’s basically up to the people to behave themselves if they want to keep this…I keep saying that this is a privilege.”

Related: Princeton council votes to open parts of KVR to motorized vehicles

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andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

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