Mark Hebblewhite - Credit: Contributed

Researcher speaks on future of mule deer

Mark Hebblewhite will be speaking tonight at UBCO

An expert ecologist will be presenting on his experiences to support the future of mule deer.

The British Columbia Wildlife Federation and the University of British Columbia Okanagan announced Mark Hebblewhite, professor at the Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, will be speaking at the UBC Campus Theatre from 7 to 8 p.m., tonight.

Related: Letter: Don’t entertain Deer Cull

Hebblewhite and his students have conducted research on large carnivores and their large herbivore prey since 1994 across Canada, Europe, and Asia.

Hebblewhite and his students have published more than 130 scientific papers on study systems such as the wolf-elk interactions in Banff National Park, pronghorn antelope migration through Alberta and Montana, mule deer ecology in Idaho, boreal mountain caribou, Amur tigers in Russia/China, and yaks on the Tibetan Plateau, according to the wildlife federation.

“B.C. is one of the most biologically diverse places in Canada, and people truly care about conservation here. I am really excited to share my experiences with the community. There is an opportunity to use science to help keep B.C. special,” said Hebblewhite.

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Following the presentation, there will be a short Q and A with Hebblewhite, Adam Ford (Canada research chair in Wildlife Restoration Ecology, Department of Biology, UBCO) , and Jesse Zeman (BC Wildlife Federation) to discuss ongoing wildlife research priorities in British Columbia and how lessons from other states and provinces can inform conservation in British Columbia, according to the wildlife federation.

“Dr. Hebblewhite has changed the way we think about the ecological role of nutrition, predators, weather, and how animals move through the landscape,” said Ford. “British Columbians could learn a lot from Dr. Hebblewhite and how university research can support policies around land use and wildlife conservation.”

Hebblewhite obtained his Bachelor of Science from the University of Guelph, his master’s degree at the University of Montana, and his PhD in Ecology in 2006 in Biological Sciences at the University of Alberta, according to the federation. He is currently a subject matter editor at Ecology and Ecological Monographs and a board member of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative.

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