An eagle suffering from lead poisoning was found in Elko on February 12. Submitted

An eagle suffering from lead poisoning was found in Elko on February 12. Submitted

Sick eagle in East Kootenay town sparks call for lead bullet restriction

Wildlife advocates encouraging residents to switch from lead bullets, to a non-lead alternative

Wildlife advocates are calling for a restriction on lead hunting products after an eagle suffering from lead poisoning was found in Elko.

Nycki Wannamaker is a volunteer with Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (OWL) in Vancouver and was called into action on February 12 when a sick golden eagle was discovered close to a deer carcass.

The eagle had been found by an Elko resident earlier that day, feeding on the deer with several others eagles. When the local approached and the bird didn’t fly off, the resident thought it might have sustained an injury in the food scrum. She quickly called OWL, who directed Wannamaker to the scene.

The eagle was safely captured and a flight to Vancouver the following day was arranged for it. It stayed with Wannamaker overnight and she observed that it was very lethargic and easily handled, which she explained is out of the ordinary for any bird, let alone a bird of prey.

“This is alarming,” said Wannamaker. “… this is human caused. A non-kill shot to the deer during hunting season could have left the lead in the deer’s body.”

She explained that a lodged bullet fragment will not necessarily cause lead poisoning, however, an ingested fragment causes poisoning much faster.

Wannamaker further explained that shooting nuisance animals, such as rabbits, groundhogs and coyotes, can pose a risk of lead poisoning for scavenging animals like golden eagles. In addition, lead fishing lures ingested by a fish can cause lead poisoning in birds of prey.

Lead paint and contaminated soil also have but very rarely contributed to lead poisoning in raptors, according to Wannamaker.

After arriving with the OWL team in Vancouver, the eagle tested positive for lead. The bird’s blood rating was 44.7 ug/mL. According to OWL, a rating of 60 is considered high but any rating above 20 is usually fatal.

After several days of treatment, the lead levels in the bird dropped to 15.2 ug/mL. As lead levels continue to fall, the bird will be moved to a flight cage for the remainder of its recovery, if everything goes according to plan.

Returning an animal to full health after lead poisoning is a long and expensive journey, explained OWL Raptor Care Manager Rob Hope. The bird will be re-bled several times during its recovery, which could take up to several weeks. In the past, OWL has cared for animals anywhere from two days up to nine months.

“We want to make sure there are no long-term effects from lead because we have had eagles that basically their brains are fried, even by the time we get the lead down to zero,” said Hope. “There’s basically too much damage in the bird and it can’t fend for itself, so it has to be put down.”

When an eagle ingests food containing lead, it will sit in their crop (belly) before passing through the bird. While it is in the crop, the lead can leach into their bloodstream, where it will be stored in their bones as calcium.

Hope explained that lead can affect a bird in many different ways, from neurotic to respiratory issues.

“Basically time is of the essence with it,” said Hope. “If we get them in time, we can save them.”

OWL sees over 700 injured birds pass through their front doors every year. It is the go-to place in B.C. for injured birds of prey.

Today, it is easier to treat birds affected by lead poisoning than it was in the past, according to Hope.

Previously, the blood of a sick bird would have to be sent off to be tested for lead poisoning, which could take two to four weeks.

Now, OWL can test a bird in house and find out within 180 seconds whether it has lead poisoning. Hope added that transportation is also a lot easier thanks to a sponsorship agreement with Pacific Coastal Airlines.

He explained that there are alternatives to lead ammunition. In the past five years, copper, polymer-tipped bullets have broken into the hunting industry and are being used by more hunters as an alternative to copper-jacket lead-core bullets.

Fernie Rod and Gun Club president Kevin Marasco explained that hunters choose their bullets mainly based on personal preference and performance. He added that the cost of lead to non-lead are similar.

“I went to the Barnes (copper) bullets after seeing the effects of lead bullets years ago, breaking apart in the animal and fragmenting all through the meat,” said Marasco. “The 100 per cent copper bullet usually remains intact and retains the majority of its original weight.”

Hope hopes that regulations will eventually change to restrict the use of lead bullets.

“We’re not against hunting, we’re not against any outdoor activity, actually I myself hunt,” said Hope.

“It’s just a matter of changing the persona. The alternatives are out there now… Somebody could spend an extra 10 bucks on a box of bullets that could not only be healthier for them and their families, but also for any wildlife that may scavenge or take anything that’s been killed or left behind.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

OWL volunteer Colin Iverson holds the eagle while it undergoes Chelation Treatment, a procedure which neutralizes the lead inside its body.  Submitted

OWL volunteer Colin Iverson holds the eagle while it undergoes Chelation Treatment, a procedure which neutralizes the lead inside its body. Submitted

Just Posted

A Dodge Ram pickup similar to this one was involved in a hit-and-run in Lake Country on Saturday, Jan. 16. (Crime Stoppers photo)
Stolen truck involved in Lake Country hit-and-run

Incident happened on Highway 97 just before 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 16

The Okanagan Regional Library is holding a pair of online contests for its young readers. (File photo)
Okanagan Regional Library challenges young readers

Pair of contests online aimed at kids aged up to 18

Kelowna Fire Department. (FILE)
Early morning downtown Kelowna dumpster fire deemed suspicious

RCMP and the Kelowna Fire Department will conduct investigations into the cause of the blaze

Terrance Josephson of the Princeton Posse, at left, and Tyson Conroy of the Summerland Steam clash during a Junior B hockey game at the Summerland Arena in the early spring of 2020. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
QUIZ: How much do you know about hockey?

Test your knowledge of Canada’s national winter sport

A COVID-19 exposure has been confirmed at Black Mountain Elementary in Kelowna Saturday, Jan. 23, 2021. (Google Image)
Another COVID-19 exposure confirmed at Kelowna school

Interior Health confirmed an exposure at Black Mountain Elementary School Saturday

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders sits in on a COVID-19 briefing with Dr. Bonnie Henry, provincial health officer, and Adrian Dix, B.C. minister of health. (Birinder Narang/Twitter)
PHOTOS: Bernie Sanders visits B.C. landmarks through the magic of photo editing

Residents jump on viral trend of photoshopping U.S. senator into images

Auldin Maxwell stacks the 693rd block on the top of record-breaking Jenga tower on Nov. 29. (Submitted)
Salmon Arm boy rests world-record attempt on single Jenga brick

Auldin Maxwell, 12, is now officially a Guinness world record holder.

A woman injects herself with crack cocaine at a supervised consumption site Friday, Jan. 22, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Drug users at greater risk of dying as services scale back in second wave of COVID-19

It pins the blame largely on a lack of supports, a corrupted drug supply

Wet’suwet’en supporters and Coastal GasLink opponents continue to protest outside the B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, February 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
‘We’re still in it’: Wet’suwet’en push forward on rights recognition

The 670-km Coastal GasLink pipeline was approved by B.C. and 20 elected First Nations councils on its path

Jennifer Cochrane, a Public Health Nurse with Prairie Mountain Health in Virden, administers the COVID-19 vaccine to Robert Farquhar with Westman Regional Laboratory, during the first day of immunizations at the Brandon COVID-19 vaccination supersite in Brandon, Man., on Monday, January 18, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tim Smith - POOL
Top doctor urges Canadians to keep up with COVID measures, even as vaccines roll out

More than 776,606 vaccines have been administered so far

From the left: Midway RCMP Csts. Jonathan Stermscheg and Chris Hansen, Public Servant Leanne Mclaren and Cpl. Phil Peters. Pictured in the front are Mclaren’s dog, Lincoln and Peters’ dog, Angel. Photo courtesy of BC RCMP
B.C. Mounties commended for bringing firewood to elderly woman

Cpl. Phil Peters said he and detachment members acted after the woman’s husband went to hospital

Dr. Jerome Leis and Dr. Lynfa Stroud are pictured at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto on Thursday, January 21, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
‘It wasn’t called COVID at the time:’ One year since Canada’s first COVID-19 case

The 56-year-old man was admitted to Toronto’s Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

An Uber driver’s vehicle is seen after the company launched service, in Vancouver, Friday, Jan. 24, 2020. Several taxi companies have lost a court bid to run Uber and Lyft off the road in British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Taxi companies lose court bid to quash Uber, Lyft approvals in British Columbia

Uber said in a statement that the ruling of the justice is clear and speaks for itself

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Most Read