Provincial data from March 1 shows the snow pack in the Okanagan was below normal as of March 1, 2022. Accoriding to rpovincial data, there is a higher than normal risk of flooding in British Colubmia this year. (Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development image)

Provincial data from March 1 shows the snow pack in the Okanagan was below normal as of March 1, 2022. Accoriding to rpovincial data, there is a higher than normal risk of flooding in British Colubmia this year. (Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development image)

Snow levels below normal in Okanagan and Boundary regions

Cool temperatures and increased risk of flooding forecast for this spring

The snowpack levels in the Okanagan and Boundary regions are below normal, according to the latest statistics from the province.

The March 1 data, from the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development, was released on March 9. While the overall measurements for the province are slightly above normal, the Southern Interior had measurements below normal levels.

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In the Okanagan, the snowpack was at 86 per cent of normal levels, while in the Boundary, the snowpack was at 91 per cent of normal levels. The snowpack was at 100 per cent of normal levels in the Similkameen. In the Upper Columbia region, which includes Revelstoke and Golden, the snowpack is significantly higher, at 123 per cent of normal levels.

Regions with snowpack levels above normal are at a higher risk for flooding. In addition, spring weather conditions play a role in the risk of spring floods in British Columbia.

Seasonal conditions from Environment and Climate Change Canada indicate an increased likelihood of below-normal temperatures from March through May.

The normal to above normal snowpack levels in much of the province, as well as La Nina conditions this spring and seasonal forecasts calling for cooler conditions, meaning there is an elevated risk for freshet-related flooding, according to a report from the ministry.

This is the second year in a row with La Nina conditions. La Nina conditions result in cooler temperatures in British Columbia and wetter weather on the South Coast and on Vancouver Island.

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