Fall in Kelowna, B.C. (Contributed)

Fall in Kelowna, B.C. (Contributed)

Summer temperatures in Okanagan to continue through September

Environment Canada forecasts temperatures in the high 20s through mid-September

Summer fun in the Okanagan isn’t over just yet, despite the commencement of fall, according to meteorologists.

Doug Lundquist with Environment Canada said Sept. 1. is regarded as the first day of fall meteorologically.

“Most countries have converted to (thinking of Sept. 1. as the first day of fall) because it makes more sense based on the weather,” said Lunquist.

The Sept. 22 date is widely regarded as the first day of fall due to when the equinox takes place which is more of an astronomical event than meteorological, stated Lunquist.

For August, Kelowna was about a half-degree above average at 21.1 C, compared to the monthly average of 20.7 C.

“It was a little warmer and dryer than usual in Kelowna in August because early summer started off really wet,” said Lundquist.

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For the summer period from June through August, British Columbia recorded the second most lightning occurrences on record, which goes back about 20 years.

In September, Lundquist is forecasting a major ridge of high-pressure build up on the West Coast that is going to affect the Interior as well. He expects some sunny weather over the next week with Sept. 2 being a rainy day with a bit of a cold front.

Up to ten days from today, (Sept. 2.), Lundquist said Okanagan residents can expect temperatures in the high 20s, touching 30 C, with cooler temperatures at night.

“This is gorgeous weather for us,” said Lundquist.

“It can be really pleasant having summer weather pushing through into the fall.”

Lundquist also said it is highly likely that fall as a whole will likely have above-average temperatures.

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Daniel Taylor
Reporter, Kelowna Capital News
Email me at daniel.taylor@kelownacapnews.com
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