President Donald Trump visits a neighborhood impacted by Hurricane Florence, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018, in Conway, S.C., accompanied by South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., right. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The longest week: Carolinas worn out by Florence

Frustration and sheer exhaustion are building as thousands of people wait to go home seven days after the storm began battering the coast.

Hurricane Florence is still wearing out the Carolinas, where residents have endured an agonizing week of violent winds, torrential rain, widespread flooding, power outages and death.

Frustration and sheer exhaustion are building as thousands of people wait to go home seven days after the storm began battering the coast. Florence is blamed for at least 37 deaths, including those of two women who drowned when a sheriff’s van taking them to a mental health facility was swept off a road.

“I’m just ready for this to be over, to be honest” said Evan Jones, a college student who evacuated from Wilmington and doesn’t know when he will get back. “I’m trying to get it all out of my head.”

With the remnants of Florence finally out to sea and skies bright over rivers still swelling with muddy water, President Donald Trump visited the disaster zone, riding through soggy neighbourhoods and helping pass out warm meals at a church in the hard-hit coastal town of New Bern.

“How’s the house?” Trump told one person. “You take care of yourself.”

There wasn’t any presidential fanfare 120 miles away in Fayetteville. There, Roberta and Joseph Keithley had been sleeping on cots set up in a school classroom since Friday. They still didn’t know if their home was ruined.

“It’s getting a little frustrating, but you have to deal with it and roll with the punches,” said Roberta Keithley, 73. “It’s just another hurdle to get over in life.”

To the south, daybreak brought a return of floodwaters to Nichols, South Carolina, which also was inundated by Hurricane Matthew two years ago. The flooding from Florence had subsided, only to get worse again.

Mayor Lawson Battle said that as far as he knew, everyone in the town of about 360 people evacuated as the water first started to invade town Monday. But Battle just couldn’t think about that anymore.

“I’m focusing on this disaster at hand,” he said. “I don’t have time to think. I’m just so tired.”

Access improved to Wilmington, a North Carolina port city of 120,000 that was cut off for days by high water. But officials said they don’t know when evacuees would be able to return home, and it may be next week before conditions improve drastically since the Cape Fear River isn’t expected to crest at the city until Monday or Tuesday.

“Understand: There is a lot of water inland, and it is continuing to make its way downstream,” county manager Chris Coudreit said.

Nearly 3 feet (0.9 metres) of rain fell in places, and dozens of cities had more than 10 inches (25 centimetres) of rain. Roads remained dangerous, and some were still being closed as swollen rivers emptied toward the ocean.

Related: VIDEO: ‘Monster’ Hurricane Florence aims to drench Carolinas

North Carolina officials said some 7,800 people remained in shelters, down from about 10,000 on Monday despite Gov. Roy Cooper’s plea to stay put.

In Lumberton, where the Lumber River still covered parts of town, water was deep enough that vehicles passing by on streets sent wakes into partially submerged homes, businesses and a church.

Some of those who left shelters may have been headed toward the coast on U.S. 421, where a long line of cars, utility crews and trucks loaded with generators sat in a jam.

About 161,000 homes and businesses were still without electricity in North Carolina, more than a quarter of them in the county where Wilmington is located.

The deaths, which have occurred in three states, include those of two women who were being taken to a mental health facility when the van they were riding in was engulfed by floodwaters from the Little Pee Dee River in South Carolina, authorities said.

Horry County Sheriff’s Department spokeswoman Brooke Holden said two deputies in the van tried to get the victims out but couldn’t. Rescue teams plucked the deputies from the top of the vehicle. They were placed on leave pending an investigation.

Sheriff Phillip Thompson said he does not believe the women were in restraints like those sometimes used on psychiatric patients.

It wasn’t clear why the women were being moved in the aftermath of a killer hurricane, and Justin Bamberg, a lawyer who has represented the families of several people injured or killed by law officers, said he was perplexed by the decision.

“If that road is in an area where it is a flood risk, and waters were rising, why were they driving on that road anyway?” said Bamberg, a state lawmaker.

At least 24 of the victims died in vehicles, and most were in accidents linked to flooding.

North Carolina’s farmers, meanwhile, are beginning to count up their losses.

The Tobacco Growers Association of North Carolina estimated up to 125 million pounds (57 million kilograms) of tobacco leaf could be damaged by flooding, winds and power outages, an amount that could translate to as much as $350 million in lost farm revenue.

Association CEO Graham Boyd said about 40 per cent of the crop was still in the field when the storm hit. North Carolina is the nation’s top producer of tobacco.

The flooding has killed an estimated 3.4 million chickens and 5,500 hogs, authorities said. Farmers are also concerned about cotton, sweet potatoes, peanuts and corn, but swamped roads and fields have made it difficult to assess the damage.

The risk of environmental damage from Florence mounted, too, as human and animal waste was washed into the floodwaters.

More than 5 million gallons (18 million litres) of partially treated sewage spilled into the Cape Fear River after power went out at a treatment plant, officials said, and the earthen dam at a pond holding hog waste was breached, spilling its contents.

Related: Hurricane Center: Florence makes landfall in N. Carolina

Collins reported from Columbia, South Carolina. AP photographer Chuck Burton in Sampson County, North Carolina; and AP writers Skip Foreman in Charlotte, North Carolina; Alex Derosier in Fayetteville, North Carolina; and Jay Reeves in Atlanta contributed to this report.

___

Claire Galofaro And Jeffrey Collins, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

West Kelowna to hire eight more firefighters

The city looks to solve what they are calling a critical shortage of firefighters

Kelowna RCMP look to reunite stamp collection with owner

The stamp collection was handed to RCMP in Oct.

Kelowna RCMP search for speed-slowing cut out

The cut out of Const. Warren Ning has been allegedly taken from A.S. Matheson Elementary School

Battling winter blues, depression and SAD after the holidays

Kick the blues on ‘Blue Monday’ that is supposedly the most depressing day of the year

UPDATE: B.C. legislature managers accused of excessive travel, expenses

Speaker Darryl Plecas’ report details ‘flagrant overspending’

‘Blue Monday’ isn’t real, but depression can be

CMHA encourages people to prioritize their mental health

Anti-pipeline group wants NEB to consider impact of emissions, climate change

Stand.earth filed NEB motion asking to apply same standard to the project as it did with Energy East pipeline

B.C. man charged in 2014 snake venom death of toddler

Henry Thomas was taking care of the North Vancouver girl the day before she died

Parole granted for drunk driver who killed B.C. RCMP officer

Kenneth Jacob Fenton will be able to attend alcohol abuse treatment, nearly three years after crash that killed Const. Sarah Beckett

B.C.’s largest public-sector union wants inquiry into money laundering, drugs

Union officials say Premier John Horgan and Attorney General David Eby have not ruled out the possibility of a public inquiry

Teen in confrontation with Native American: I didn’t provoke

Nick Sandmann of Covington Catholic High School said he was trying to defuse the situation

Man admits responsibility for 2016 death of Shuswap motorcyclist

Brian Watson, 60, died after being struck while riding his motorcycle on Squilax-Anglemont Road

Most Read