The twisted remains of a building crane hang off a construction project in Halifax Nova Scotia in the wake of Dorian, Sunday, Sept. 8, 2019. The storm that has already walloped the Virgin Islands, Bahamas and North Carolina brought hurricane-force winds to far-eastern Canada on Sunday, knocking out power to hundreds of thousands of people. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press via AP)

Trudeau, ministers to visit Halifax and survey Dorian recovery efforts

PM, Ralph Goodale and Harjit Sajjan to meet with local officials and Armed Forces representatives

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and two federal cabinet ministers will visit the Halifax area on Tuesday to survey the damage caused by Dorian, the hurricane-strength post-tropical storm that slammed into the Maritimes on the weekend.

Trudeau, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale and Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan are scheduled to meet with local officials and Armed Force representatives at a Halifax armoury for a briefing on relief efforts.

Goodale and Sajjan will later visit Herring Cove, N.S., a coastal community south of Halifax near where Dorian made landfall on Saturday night.

As the storm approached the coastline, it lashed the area with driving rain and gusts reaching almost 150 kilometres per hour — approaching the power of a Category 2 hurricane.

There have been no reported injuries, but roofs were torn off and trees were snapped like twigs, pulling down power lines across a wide swath of the Maritimes.

At one point, more than 500,000 electricity consumers in the region were without power, representing 80 per cent of the homes and businesses in Nova Scotia and 75 per cent in Prince Edward Island.

In New Brunswick, about 80,000 homes and businesses — 20 per cent of NB Power’s customers — were left in the dark at the height of the storm.

As the recovery effort entered Day 3, those numbers have dropped considerably. However, more than 100,000 Nova Scotia Power customers were still without electricity Tuesday morning, and the company said it would be Thursday before everyone is reconnected.

The company says it has found about 3,700 trees on power lines that stretch across 32,000 kilometres, and repairs are being made to 300 broken or leaning utility poles.

As well, about 4,500 outages across Nova Scotia represent individual customers, which means one repair will bring electricity back to only one customer.

“We know this is frustrating and customers want their power back as soon as possible. That’s what we want, too,” Nova Scotia Power CEO Karen Hutt said in a statement.

“Complex outages must be pushed back in a number of cases.”

Meanwhile, about 300 soldiers from Canadian Forces Base Gagetown in New Brunswick showed up in the Halifax region on Monday to help with the cleanup.

Light armoured vehicles were spotted patrolling the streets as soldiers with chainsaws were ready to clear the streets of fallen trees.

However, they were prevented from removing some trees because limbs were still tangled in power lines, which meant an electrician was needed to ensure safety.

Power crews from Quebec, Ontario, Florida and Maine have been called in to help.

Public schools in Nova Scotia remained closed Tuesday.

Michael MacDonald, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Pleasure boats take a beating along the waterfront in Halifax as hurricane Dorian approaches on Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Just Posted

Missing toddler found safe near Beaverdell

The child had been missing in the Clark Lake area for more than two hours

Federal Conservative leadership candidate skirts COVID-19 rules at Kelowna rally

Derek Sloan held a rally in Kelowna that had more than 50 people, which is against health orders from the province

Highway 97 upgrade option for Peachland faces 20-year delay

Peachland council disappointed by highways department decision

Partial closure on Cadder Avenue for utility upgrades

Traffic will be reduced to westbound traffic from Aug. 17 to Sept. 11

Kelowna Hells Angels prospect charged with assault, choking

Jason Townsend, 43, was charged after allegedly choking a woman last weekend

Video: SUV burns alongside the highway near Salmon Arm

Footage of the burning vehicle was posted to Youtube.

Teachers to get 2 extra days to prepare for students’ return, now set for Sept. 10

Students will first start with orientation and learn rules of COVID-19 classroom policies

High-volume littering at Cape Scott draws ire from hiking groups

Popular Vancouver Island hiking spot not closing, but frustration about crowding grows

SFU to drop ‘Clan’ varsity team name

The ‘Clan’ name is shortened from ‘Clansmen,’ and was introduced roughly 55 years ago

New Tory leader must build a strong team in Commons and for the campaign: Scheer

Scheer marked his final day in the House of Commons today as leader of the Opposition

South Okanagan restaurant ranked among world’s best by TripAdvisor

The Hooded Merganser was ranked within the top 10 per cent of all restaurants by TripAdvisor reviews

B.C. to hire 500 more COVID-19 contact tracers ahead of fall

Contract tracers add an ‘extra layer’ in the fight against the novel coronavirus

Wedding party bear sprayed at North Okanagan campsite

Latest criminal activity at the Meadows leaves locals frustrated

Summerland council to examine meeting options

Present livestreaming has been plagued with sound quality issues

Most Read