Writers reveal trials, triumphs

Successful writers Sterling Haynes, Laurie Carter and Jarrod Thalheimer explain their writing process, discuss their publishing adventures and read from their books at the next meeting of the Okanagan Institute Express.

  • Jan. 18, 2011 10:00 a.m.

Successful writers Sterling Haynes, Laurie Carter and Jarrod Thalheimer explain their writing process, discuss their publishing adventures and read from their books at the next meeting of the Okanagan Institute Express.

It takes place Thursday, 5 p.m., at the Bohemian Cafe, 524 Bernard.

Sterling Haynes received his medical degree from the University of Alberta. He served as a colonial officer in Nigeria and practised medicine in the Cariboo, Alberta and Alabama.

Now retired, Sterling Haynes lives in Westbank and travels extensively in Central America.

His articles and poetry have been published in journals including The Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine and the Medical Post.

He obtained his medical degree from the University of Alberta, and practiced medicine in the Cariboo region of B.C., Alberta and Alabama. He has also served as a colonial officer in Nigeria.

Laurie Carter’s freelance work appears in magazines and newspapers in Canada and the United States.

Her latest book, Grandma Wears Hiking Boots: A Personal Guide to the Okanagan Valley, was released in November.

Her stories and photographs reflect an interest in everything from architecture to winemakers, from hiking to folk singers, from ancient ruins to street vendors.

A transplant from southern Ontario, Laurie is passionate about her adopted home.

And while she loves foreign travel and frequently writes about her experiences in Europe, Asia, the Caribbean, Mexico, South America and Africa, she is best known as an expert on the Okanagan Valley.

Jarrod Thalheimer is a freelance writer and opinion columnist.

His work has appeared in numerous print and web publications across North America.

He is a graduate of the UCLA Creative Writing Program with a focus on short and long fiction.

His short story, The Zeppo Chair, was published as a chapbook and he was a chapter winner in a fiction contest sponsored by the Vancouver Province.

Currently, he writes his weekly syndicated column AdFool along with numerous other feature, long-form and script-based projects.

The Okanagan Institute Express is presented in association with the Okanagan Regional Library and Okanagan College.

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