A pause for thought

While we are engaged in debate in Kelowna over many issues, from an RCMP officer kicking an arrested suspect in the head to whether or not city councillors should get a raise, there is always hope that the issues we face will be resolved and we will move forward.

While we are engaged in debate in Kelowna over many issues, from an RCMP officer kicking an arrested suspect in the head to whether or not city councillors should get a raise, there is always hope that the issues we face will be resolved and we will move forward.

For the people of Haiti, there is little of that hope to cling to. It’s been one year since a 7.0-magnitude earthquake brought this nation to its knees.

Billions of dollars have been pledged to help the country get back on its feet, but the country still can’t get a foothold it seems. From Haiti’s grim cholera-ridden streets, we in Canada should have a new appreciation for what we have, especially for the basics of food, water, shelter, health care and well-run government.

Reconstruction of the country is moving in slow motion. Only five per cent of the rubble in the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince has been cleared since the earthquake.

According to Canadian officials, 85 per cent of its citizens lived in abject poverty before the quake. Only one in five had access to clean water.

After the earth shook, 30 hospitals were destroyed. Three out of four medical schools were levelled, as was the nation’s largest nursing hospital.

Add hurricanes, disease and political instability to the mix, and the devastation is worse than some war zones.

Meanwhile, many of us Canadians go about our daily lives and find plenty to complain about. Some Haitians lost entire families in the quake and have little to live for. One million people are homeless or in camps. Sexual violence is rampant. But in spite of all that, the Haitian people haven’t given up on their nation. It’s a sombre situation that offers us plenty of reasons to pause and be grateful for what we have in Canada.

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