Cotton reusable bag given out by B.C. Liquor Stores 20 years ago. It’s never been entirely clear how plastic bags threaten the Vancouver Island marmot or the burrowing owl. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

Cotton reusable bag given out by B.C. Liquor Stores 20 years ago. It’s never been entirely clear how plastic bags threaten the Vancouver Island marmot or the burrowing owl. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

B.C. VIEWS: Politicians pose on plastic bags

Virtue signalling distracts from local government performance

It’s a municipal election year, with four-year terms of office on the line for communities around B.C. this fall.

So now is a good time for voters to start watching for grand gestures from local politicians to distract you from potholes, pot shops, parking tickets, snow non-removal, screwed-up sewers, bungled bridges, overpriced arenas, overbuilt bike lanes, and of course ever-rising property taxes.

The flavour of the year for 2018 looks to be plastic bags. The nanny-state enthusiasts at Victoria city hall are running to the front of this parade, imposing fines and regulations on businesses and their employees starting on July 1, to stop them from recklessly putting customer purchases into plastic bags.

Politicians refer to them as “single-use” bags, and as with much of modern environmentalism, that’s not strictly true. People re-use them all the time, taking them back to the store or lining wastebaskets to reduce consumption of those other disposable bags. Or they carefully recycle them, using elaborate plastic recycling systems that will still be needed.

These social engineering bylaws don’t come close to getting rid of plastic bags and packaging. They come with a string of exemptions, to allow transport of fresh or frozen meats, vegetables, bakery buns and bulk items, from nuts to nails. Frozen peas and other convenience foods will continue to be sold in plastic bags. Electronics, tools and toys will still come in those hard bubble packs that require a Jedi light-sabre to open, and all that stuff has to be sorted and recycled.

The City of Victoria web page kindly allows that newspapers, dry cleaning and new bedding may still be protected by plastic bags, which it grimly notes are a product of “non-renewable fossil fuels.” Businesses may provide paper bags for a minimum 12 cents each (nice round figure), or $2 for a bag that is officially recognized as reusable.

Two obvious absurdities arise. Most “reusable” bags are made from woven plastic, generally shipped from China. And as Victoria admits, making paper bags produces more greenhouse gas emissions than turning natural gas into plastic bags.

Like many people, I voluntarily converted to reusable bags many years ago, because they cut down on waste and they work better. I have a batch at home, more in the car and one tough packable bag that travels to work in my backpack.

My collection includes a 20-year-old cotton bag with a picture of a pelican and a slogan “keep them alive.” This notion that plastic kills water birds is great propaganda, and it illustrates how the anti-plastic movement is marketed.

A friend recently posted an old picture on Facebook, showing a duck with one of those six-pack rings around its neck. You may have seen a similar one where a turtle’s shell grew deformed after it managed to get one of those plastic rings around it while it was small. A dozen people quickly chimed in to agree they were taught as kids to cut up those rings before throwing them out.

Of course this misses the point entirely. The task is not to make them safe for disposal, it’s to recycle the plastic, or at least keep it out of waterways. Should tipsy fishermen cut up their rings before tossing them overboard to join their empty beer cans? Better to collect them in a plastic bag for proper recycling.

Fun fact: Victoria Coun. Ben Isitt sees himself taking “leadership” on plastic bags, rejecting the idea that the province should handle this to make it consistent. If you want leadership, see the local government that banned them in 2009. That would be the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, better known as Fort McMurray.

Tom Fletcher is B.C. legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press. Email: tfletcher@blackpress.ca


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislatureMunicipal election

Just Posted

People participated in a walk to honour the 215 children found at a former Kamloops residential school, as well as residential school survivors. (Twila Amato/Black Press Media)
Kelowna marks National Indigenous Peoples’ Day with walk to remember Kamloops 215

“Let’s speak the truth and deal with the truth, and heal.”

Kelowna Cabs’ dispatchers will be coming back to work now that their union and the taxi company have come to an agreement. (Facebook/Kelowna Cabs)
Kelowna Cabs dispatchers set to go back to work

The taxi company and the dispatchers’ union have reached an agreement

t
Motorcyclist critically injured in Westside Road collision

Motorcyclist collides with vehicle, struck by another: preliminary police findings

People at the beach in front of Discovery Bay Resort on Tuesday, July 14. (Michael Rodriguez - Capital News)
Heat wave forecast for Okanagan-Shuswap

Temperatures are forecast to hit record breaking highs this week

The Crofton trailer park home where the bodies of two people were found. (Photo by Don Bodger)
Kelowna mom still waiting for answers after daughter and her fiance found dead

Pair discovered in their Vancouver Island home in May identified as Rachel Gardner and Paul Jenkins

The border crossing into the United States is seen during the COVID-19 pandemic in Lacolle, Que. on February 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
VIDEO: Border quarantine to soon lift for fully vaccinated Canadians

Eligible travellers must still take multiple COVID-19 tests

Chilliwack secondary school’s principal is apologizing after a quote equating graduation with the end of slavery in the U.S. was included in the 2020-2021 yearbook. (Screenshot from submitted SnapChat)
B.C. student’s yearbook quote equates grad to end of slavery; principal cites editing error

Black former student ‘disgusted’ as CSS principal apologizes for what is called an editing error

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross. (Photo by Peter Versteege)
BC Liberal leadership candidate condemns ‘senseless violence’ of Okanagan church fires

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross says reconciliation isn’t about revenge for past tragedies

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A coroner’s inquest will be taking place at the Capitol Theatre in Port Alberni for the next week. (ELENA RARDON / ALBERNI VALLEY NEWS)
Teen B.C. mom who died following police custody recalled as ‘friend to many’

Police sent Jocelyn George to hospital after intoxication had gone ‘beyond the realm’ of normal detox

FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2020, file photo, Las Vegas Raiders defensive end Carl Nassib leaves the field after an NFL football game against the Atlanta Falcons in Atlanta. Nassib on Monday, June 21, 2021, became the first active NFL player to come out as gay. Nassib announced the news on Instagram, saying he was not doing it for the attention but because “I just think that representation and visibility are so important.” (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
Nassib becomes first active NFL player to come out as gay

More than a dozen NFL players have come out as gay after their careers were over

Photograph By MICHAEL POTESTIO.KTW
Former Kamloops security gaurd wants job back after kicking incident caught on video

Rick Eldridge quit when a video surfaced of him kicking a man outside a facility for homeless

COVID-19 daily cases reported to B.C. public health, seven-day moving average to June 17, 2021. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C.’s COVID-19 infections drop to 90 on Sunday, 45 Monday

Pandemic spread dwindles as 77% of adults receive vaccine

(Black Press file photo)
EDITORIAL: Curtailing attempts at scams

The true total of losses from all scams and frauds could be much higher than the figures on file

Most Read