Dennison: Return Christmas to being a holy holiday

Hooray for Barnhardt arguing that merchants and everyone…observe what it signifies—the birth of Jesus Christ 2012 years ago.

To the editor:

Two terrific letters in the Capital News of Nov. 30 by Gary Barnhardt and Richard Callihan. Although vastly different in the issues addressed, I found their provocative words directly opposite each other on the opinion pages to be intimately inter-connected in spirit—especially so in the spirit of the current season.

Hooray for Barnhardt arguing that merchants and everyone, in fact, extend their greetings exactly in joyous observance of what it signifies—the birth of Jesus Christ 2012 years ago on Dec. 25, and, thus, “Merry Christmas.”Discard, as he writes, all the other bland, meaningless expressions like “happy holidays” for so-called political correctness which, I contend, isn’t an iota “correct”, politically and otherwise.

And cheers for Callihan who urged everyone to refuse buying anything made in Bangladesh sweatshops. His plea ignites from his shock at news recently of more than 100 deaths claimed in a fire at such a shop where workers risk their lives daily in deplorable working and living conditions for $45 monthly.

As he pointed out, imagine the impact in thousands of lives potentially preserved and perhaps ultimately improved if most North American consumers boycotted goods made in Bangladesh and other nations with such intolerable conditions. In Callihan’s words, that would happen “if we could force the big box stores in North America to cut their billions of dollars in profits by just a few per cent…”

Yep, and I thought that would be so in the spirit of Christ, who spoke out and crusaded so vigorously against gross injustices in His earthly life, although they may have been of a smaller scale than today’s heartless Bangladesh injustice. Bet Jesus would crusade against it were He with us today.

Might I ask, as well, all those who so worship being “politically correct,” and some of whom may have Christmas trees adorning their abodes, what exactly do you celebrate on Dec. 25?

Anyway, to all, a Merry Christmas, and a happy holiday, and holy day Dec. 25.

Wally Dennison,

Kelowna

Kelowna Capital News