Liberal leader Justin Trudeau and wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau wave as they go on stage at Liberal election headquarters in Montreal, Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

EDITORIAL: The wishes of the voters

While the results will not please everyone, this is, more or less, what Canadian voters have chosen

The election is over. The people have spoken.

And while the results will not please everyone, this is, more or less, what the Canadian voting public has chosen.

As a result, the Liberals have won the most seats, but not a majority, and will form the governing party.

The Conservatives will be the official opposition, even though they received a marginally larger share of the popular vote.

Others in the House of Commons include the Bloc Quebecois, the New Democratic Party, the Green Party and one independent candidate.

In the end, however, all voters were given the opportunity to be a part of this decision-making process and to determine the direction of the country.

READ ALSO: Trudeau has won the most seats — but not a majority. What happens next?

READ ALSO: Federal election saw 66% of registered voters hit the polls across Canada

Considering the diversity of this country and the diversity of the Canadian population, it should come as no surprise that voters did not speak with a united voice at the polls.

However, before the votes had been counted in British Columbia, some were already complaining about the outcome.

An hour after the voting had ended some had already suggested the western provinces should separate from the rest of the country.

And after the votes had been tallied, people were expressing their disappointment with the outcome of the election.

This does not make sense.

READ ALSO: ‘Wexit’ talk percolates day after Liberals returned to power with minority

In a democracy, the people choose the direction of government through our electoral process.

In this election, according to the Elections Canada results, 65.95 per cent of eligible voters cast ballots. Had the voter turnout been higher, the outcome might have changed.

Today, after the election is over, not all will like what they see, but the electoral process must be respected.

The election was decided by those voters who exercised their right to vote. And the wishes of the public must be respected.

Griping over the results or calling for separation accomplishes nothing positive.

The only effect it has is to divide us.

And a house — or a country — divided against itself cannot stand.

— Black Press

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