Fletcher: Little new to get excited about in B.C. Liberals renewal

For all the talk of change, the B.C. Liberals are not moving far from where they have always been.

B.C. Liberal delegates gathered for their convention on the weekend at the Chateau Whistler, the same luxury hotel where Gordon Campbell fired up the troops in 2008.

At the time, Campbell led a front-running party to a third straight majority, while Clark is a struggling underdog pleading for unity to turn back an NDP tsunami.

Hence “Free Enterprise Friday,” a discussion open to non-party members. Clark began with an upbeat speech urging party members to “reach out our arms, open the tent and be as big as we can possibly be.”

So did they? Dashing between three concurrent sessions, I missed a fair amount of it, but there were some provocative suggestions to appeal to those inclined to support the resurgent B.C. Conservatives. An accountant spoke to a packed room about the growing unfunded liability of public sector pensions, most of which are still of the “defined benefit” variety. Based on bond interest rates that have since sunk to all-time lows, these government-guaranteed pensions are now a free ride for those lucky enough to have them, funded by the taxes of private sector workers who in many cases have no pension plan at all.

There was talk of passing a law that all new public sector hires be restricted to a “defined contribution” plan where the employee and employer contribute equally and the pension is based on what those contributions yield. This would provoke the mother of all confrontations with the B.C. Federation of Labour, but there was no evidence yet that this is going beyond the talking stage.

The resolutions continued the theme of confronting the labour movement, ritual combat that seems to be an inescapable part of B.C. elections. Delegates passed two motions, one calling for public sector unions to disclose what they spend on salaries, political activities and lobbying, and another advocating a ban on unions spending compulsory dues on political campaigns.

Delegates rejected another motion that would have made membership in the B.C. Teachers’ Federation optional, an unwanted political declaration of war at a time when Clark and Education Minister Don McRae are looking to end decades of labour confrontation with the BCTF.

There was a brief debate on a motion to scrap the carbon tax, sponsored by northern members who see it as unfairly punitive on those who endure cold weather and long highway drives for themselves and the goods they need to have trucked in. This was rejected too, after delegates were reminded that the tax now takes in more than $1 billion annually that is used to reduce business and personal income taxes. Scrapping it would amount to announcing across-the-board income tax hikes.The convention overall was high-energy and well-attended, but nothing new came out of it.

Tom Fletcher is the B.C. Legislature reporter in Victoria for Black Press.


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