Gloves come off where water is concerned

It’s wonderful to read in the paper that Chief Clarence Louie is finally taking a look at the way water management is being handled and is preparing to address this problem politically with the meeting on Thursday with other chiefs of the area.

To the editor:

It’s wonderful to read in the paper that Chief Clarence Louie is finally taking a look at the way water management is being handled and is preparing to address this problem politically with the meeting on Thursday with other chiefs of the area. (Future of Okanagan Water Use at Stake, Sept. 20 Capital News.)

Any environmental push in the right direction I’m in for. I hope there will be someone there to report on the progress of the meeting and this story.

I hope that Chief Louie will not only discuss the future of the lake but also the rivers that flow into the lake where fish like kokanee spawn. Some of these rivers were native fishing camps in the past, and now they are being destroyed by the natives themselves with white man’s bulldozers—just look across the lake for evidence. Change should begin in your own back yard so your experience can be used to inspire others.

Just wanted to vent on the subject, but I wrote these words that someone might listen. I have been responsible in the past for digging up bones doing research on the fishing grounds across the lake. Dr. Nelson at UBC has sent bones for me to Drumheller Museum in Alberta and confirmed the bones are from the fifth ice age—second largest scull of a water bison ever found in Canada, maybe North America.

Chief Louis is bulldozing his peoples’ past as well as the remains of the fifth ice age.

I’m not native but I am native to Canada and my fellow Canadian is being a hypocrite.

 

 

Judy Wasyleshko,

Kelowna

 

Kelowna Capital News