Letter: Another flagger dies; when will you slow down?

You have all seen our signs, trucks and my favorite our cones. Why don’t you slow down?

To the editor:

Well,we lost another co worker today. Run over by a vehicle in a well-marked work zone, just trying to do her job. When is the driving public ever going to understand that we are human traffic signals, made of flesh and bones? A traffic control person (TCP) are highly trained and accredited workers involved in construction, infrastructure, utility and anything else to do with roads, lane closures, primarily dealing with general public safety.

You have all seen our signs, trucks and my favorite our cones. Why don’t you slow down? The first indication will be our signs, these signs tell a story of what’s to be expected ahead of you. This is a good time to slow down. The next sign will say prepare to stop. You should listen to this sign, followed by a flagger ahead sign, work zone ahead, prepare to stop, traffic control person ahead…

Are you reading this story? Can we all just slow down and choose life over stupidity. I’m a husband, father, grandfather and I’m a TCP.

Paul LeBlanc, Kelowna

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