Letter: Government should manage budget like it’s their pension

Has anyone ever noticed that when our governments are going to save us from ourselves it is going to cost us money?

To the editor:

Has anyone ever noticed that when our governments are going to save us from ourselves it is going to cost us money?

Firstly I would like to mention the carbon tax. Good for the environment? Several volcanoes spew out more carbon dioxide in a few days than humanity puts out in years.

And have you noticed that the buzz words “global warming” is no longer vogue as it has now become, “climate change.” Some scientists are alleging that the world has started a cooling cycle once again. Who is one to believe?

Now we have a new tiered system of billing for hydro, gas and water in order to conserve these resources, not that they shouldn’t be. It seems that they set the base lines for these at a low level so it doesn’t take much to get to the next plateau where the rates are higher.

Who does this affect most?

The larger families, who, in this case, subsidize the smaller household by contributing more for a larger surplus if there ever is one.

Also, when hydro or ICBC—government entities—have managed to set a surplus aside to offset some future expenditures or, heaven forbid, give us a break on fees, our illustrious government commandeers the extra with the result of these companies informing us: “We have no money so we have to raise your rates,” with government approval of course.

Our government and private businesses set out budgets which I realize have to be done in order to supply the funds required to its different sectors. But where is the incentive to save? If one doesn’t spend the budget they are given how can you ask for more next time?

Maybe if our politicians looked after our monetary needs as diligently as their own wages, golden pensions and huge payouts we would all be better off and more people wouldn’t be so apathetic and go out and vote.

John D. Grant,

Kelowna

 

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