Letter: Immigration will not help other countries, or our own

To the editor:

Firearms are not the culprit in all those massive shootings around the world, and finding solutions to this radical behaviour will require a clear and bias-free analysis to determine what the root of the problem may be.

One concern all seem to share is the actions of global government leaders like Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, who arbitrarily and against the expressed will of the citizens let a million immigrants into Germany.

It is also well documented that our own prime ministers, past and present, have opened the flood-gates to millions of immigrants from third world countries, and again, against the expressed will of the people.

Our politicians are telling us that we must help the poor people in those countries, but taking them away from friends and family, and transplanting them into radically different cultural and geophysical environments will not bring resolution to any of the problems they are experiencing in those countries, regardless of what their social, economic, or political issues may be.

If we are serious about helping them, then we must take our money and talents into those countries, and build infrastructure like schools, hospitals, and better homes, to help them become more self-sufficient.

Canadian corporations are already doing a commendable job in many third-world countries, educating and employing local people in the development of their natural resources.

Politicians have absolutely no legal or moral right or mandate to arbitrarily decide how many people are allowed into any country. Those are the exclusive rights of the people.

When politicians violate those rights, it promotes serious concerns and dissension, in some cases even bordering hatred, and banning guns will not mute the anger and frustration these people are expressing when they are denied those rights.

Arrogant and insensitive politicians are easily perceived to be the main villains in these horrible developments.

Andy Thomsen

Kelowna

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