Letter: Parking situation costs the city lots of money

Residents are willing to spend money but there’s nowhere to park.

To the editor:

City parking is costing our city in more ways than one.

City of Kelowna’s downtown parking problem affects many people on a daily basis and affects downtown businesses just the same.

This past Saturday, I and two kids, avoided going to the Paramount Theatre to see a matinee movie only cause I knew that the longest amount of time one can plug into a metre is for two hours and Man of Steel is 2 1/2 hours long. So after two hours of time watching the movie one must go back out to the car, miss part of the movie—which really stinks to be honest—to put in more money. This makes zero sense and costs the Paramount Theatre many tickets, obviously, as so many other movie theatre choices here in Kelowna do not charge for parking, and just over the bridge, which is where we headed.

And if you had to park quite far away, it makes even less sense as then more of the movie is missed and there’s more frustration.

On the best of days it is very difficult to find a parking spot downtown as there are a very limited number of spots available so I often wonder how much business is lost to the downtown core as the City of Kelowna continues to provide few parking spots for a city of this size and a good buck to pay.

There is a multi-level parkade but, in all fairness, I never think to use it and most visitors probably do not know where it is and just get frustrated driving around trying to find a spot.

Same parking problem goes for the casino. Who wants to be ripped off $8 by the Delta Grand or even worse at times in the Prospera Place parking lot?

Our city has grown substantially over the past 10 years but yet the City of Kelowna is still way behind the times and just does not care. In my experience Kelowna needs to learn many things from our close by cities of Vernon and Penticton and how to cater much better to citizens, businesses and guests.

Wake up City of Kelowna.

Nol Preen,

Kelowna

 

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