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Letter: Serious cracks in the ‘man is at fault’ theory

Kelowna letter-writer says governments have found that a carbon tax is a cash cow

To the editor:

In his letter Climate change column is fake news (Dec. 6), Mark Goddard came across sounding a tad paranoid, but he did make a valid point that thousands of respected scientists disagree that climate change is primarily man-made. Many people naively believe that without man’s influence, the climate would remain unchanged. History has clearly shown that this is absolute rubbish.

There are serious cracks in the “man is at fault” theory. The period from 1500 to 1850, is well known as the “Little Ice Age.” All of Europe and much of the world went through centuries of bitter cold. Evidence strongly shows that much of the steady warming since around 1850, is simply due to temperatures rebounding, and has little to do with man.

Lately, carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have reached the (completely arbitrary) threshold of 400 parts per million. This is claimed to be a main cause of climate warming. Expressed in more familiar terms, 400 ppm means that 0.04 per cent of the atmosphere (way less than 1/10th of 1 per cent) is CO2. It is absurd to believe that such a miniscule CO2 level could be to blame for changing an entire climate.

Not surprisingly, governments have discovered that taxing carbon is a marvelous cash cow. In B.C., we have had 10 years of carbon taxes, during which the billions of dollars in taxes collected has had no significant change in B.C.’s climate. The solution to carbon taxation being shown to be a failure, is now to propose even higher carbon taxes. Brilliant.

Robert Wilson, Kelowna

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