Letter: US gov’t holds patent on medicinal pot use

Big pharma wants to keep medical use of marijuana suppressed to protect their drug habit.

To the editor:

With all the fuss by governments about the legality surrounding the controlled medicinal use of marijuana, it turns out the US government holds a “patent” on “pot” as a medicine.

That’s right. The patent # is 6,630,507. The holder of the patent is “The US government as represented by the Department of Health and Human Services [a cabinet post under the President].”

A quote from the patent:

“Cannabinoids have been found to have antioxidant properties, unrelated to NMDA receptor antagonism. This new found property makes cannabinoids useful in the treatment and prophylaxis of wide variety of oxidation associated diseases, such as ischemic, age-related, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The cannabinoids are found to have particular application as neuroprotectants, for example in limiting neurological damage following ischemic insults, such as stroke and trauma, or in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and HIV dementia. Non-psychoactive cannabinoids, such as cannabidoil, are particularly advantageous to use because they avoid toxicity that is encountered with psychoactive cannabinoids at high doses useful in the method of the present invention…”

Well, well. So let’s clarify the situation. The U.S. government claims marijuana is a very useful medicine yet, they reserve the right to arrest anyone who uses it as a treatment. Of course , this makes perfect sense when you are dealing with government, including our own.

But then, it also makes perfect sense when government partners, aka pharmaceutical companies, are busy developing their, ahem, “highly purified, completely reliable, extensively tested, absolutely safe,” and very profitable versions of “medicine.” Or when those companies are still clinging to the notion that marijuana can somehow be suppressed, because they realize its medicinal uses will pre-empt many of their best-selling, quite toxic drugs, which cure nothing but instead create new symptoms that “require more drugs.”

Drug companies and their federal partners continually warn against the use of home-grown marijuana as medicine, citing lack of purity, consistency, and, of course, the absence of a prescribing physician—who must be in the mix, in order to ensure the “proper dosing” of something they have little or no knowledge of.

Bottom line, it’s too late, the cows have left the barnyard and any manipulation or control by big pharma to suppress, control, contaminate, or genetically modify a natural substance will be futile because untold numbers of people are already safely using marijuana oil, because they have developed this odd idea that they are in charge of their own bodies and won’t be swayed by pharma-backed government bureaucrats and their propaganda.

Grant Baudais, Kelowna


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