Living within your means an honorable goal

The article Family of Four Poverty Line Set at $70,000 (July 21 Capital News) is an example of how misguided society has become in regard to priorities.

To the editor:

The article Family of Four Poverty Line Set at $70,000 (July 21 Capital News) is an example of how misguided society has become in regard to priorities.

Society is not about money, it’s about survival. Survival is basically three things: Food, shelter and clothing. An American native proverb states something like: “Only when the last animal is gone, last tree cut down, last fish dead in the water will people realized money cannot be eaten.”

These studies in government offices, including the regional district which conducted this one, are funded by taxpayers, many of whom do not make the required $16.98 an hour in the Central Okanagan. Why not just round it out to $17, it’s such a ridiculous number anyway. Just look at the ‘help wanted’ ads—maybe one out of 100 is within that range.

Our entire economy would collapse if not for all the employees in our malls, grocery stores, gas stations, restaurants, orchards, etc. These people don’t make the required rate for a living wage—they’re all around us. They would be dead according to this government report.

This article was published on the day B.C. Tree Fruits celebrates its 75th anniversary. The Okanagan Valley was based on hard working orchardists/agriculturists to begin with. They provided the beauty which drew tourists—a second industry. We should honor our history and realize how important this beauty is.

One problem is paying government employees to conduct ridiculous studies.

Money was originally based on the idea: “You provide me with something I need to survive and I’ll exchange this with something you need.” We’re brainwashed and bombarded by TV ads, billboards, etc., telling us what we need. We don’t need monster huge houses depleting our energy sources and forests. We don’t need to buy new gas-guzzling cars every two years. There are alternatives we have to start looking at.

I’m a single working adult. I bought a modest house here 25 years ago on a salary just over $9 an hour and some savings earned by working out of the valley. I didn’t buy into all the hype about new cars, new this and that. I clipped coupons, bought every item of clothing on sale, bought healthy foods that I cooked at home, rarely ate out. This is called survival, and don’t be discouraged you families who make under $70,000. It can be done.

But greed of those who base everything on the dollars they make can ultimately destroy societies.

 

 

Gail Green,

Kelowna

 

Kelowna Capital News