Truth and Reconciliation

Paddles were installed by Lt.-Gov. Janet Austin and T’esots’en, Patrick Kelly, a member of the award selection committee, on Nov. 22, kicking off the call for nominations for the 2023 B.C. Reconciliation Awards. (Courtesy of the Office of the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia)

PHOTOS: Artists’ paddles hung in Victoria symbolize commitment to reconciliation

Tuesday event launches call for nominations for the 2023 B.C. Reconciliation Awards

 

Jody Wilson-Raybould signs a copy of her book for Courtenay-Comox MLA Ronna-Rae Leonard during Wilson-Raybould’s induction ceremony into the Comox Valley Walk of Achievement. Photo by Terry Farrell

Reconciliation a ‘call to action to all of us,’ Jody Wilson-Raybould says in new book

Canada’s former justice minister releases ‘True Reconciliation: How to Be a Force for Change’

 

Orange shirts with “Every Child Matters” are displayed on crosses outside of the Ki Low Na Friendship Society in syilx homelands on Sept. 29 in honour of National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Photo by Aaron Hemens

Leading up to Orange Shirt Day, survivors on syilx homelands share their truths

Stories were shared ahead of National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Kelowna

 

Shuswap member Randolph Sam sings and drums in front of Vernon city hall where two new flags were raised in honour of National Day of Truth and Reconciliation Friday, Sept. 30. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)

‘We are not Native…we are Indians’: Okanagan elder

OKIB elder speaks to renaming at Vernon Truth and Reconciliation ceremony where flags temporarily raised

Shuswap member Randolph Sam sings and drums in front of Vernon city hall where two new flags were raised in honour of National Day of Truth and Reconciliation Friday, Sept. 30. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)
The ‘Every child matters’ barricade painted at the entrance to the ‘Orange Bridge’ (Riverbend Bridge) was vandalized sometime in the evening of Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)

Vandals paint racial slur on Port Alberni’s ‘Orange Bridge’ hours after reconciliation walk

Tseshaht First Nation denounces act, says there is ‘zero tolerance’ for racism in community

The ‘Every child matters’ barricade painted at the entrance to the ‘Orange Bridge’ (Riverbend Bridge) was vandalized sometime in the evening of Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)
Kelowna RCMP Inspector Beth McAndie speaks to the crowd at a Truth and Reconciliation event hosted by Ki-Low-Na Friendship Society on Sept. 29, 2022 (Brittany Webster - Capital News)

Residential school victims, survivors honoured at Ki-Low-Na Friendship Society in Kelowna

Several people shared their story at an open mic including Aden Withers on intergenerational trauma

Kelowna RCMP Inspector Beth McAndie speaks to the crowd at a Truth and Reconciliation event hosted by Ki-Low-Na Friendship Society on Sept. 29, 2022 (Brittany Webster - Capital News)
People take part in ceremonies for the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Provinces, territories face calls to make Day for Truth and Reconciliation a holiday

First Nations Leadership Council deeply concerned B.C. had not made Sept. 30 a statutory holiday.

People take part in ceremonies for the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Splatsin Elder and residential school survivor Ethel Thomas (second from left) spoke and gave a prayer to the congregation at the Splatsin Community Centre. (Brendan Shykora - Morning Star)

Hundreds march in Enderby to mark National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

The names of Splatsin survivors of residential schools were read aloud at the end of the march

Splatsin Elder and residential school survivor Ethel Thomas (second from left) spoke and gave a prayer to the congregation at the Splatsin Community Centre. (Brendan Shykora - Morning Star)
Hundreds came out in their orange shirts to the Celebration of Indigenous Culture and Resiliency in Penticton's Gyro Park on the second National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. (Brennan Phillips - Western News)

PHOTOS: Penticton’s Gyro Park a Celebration of Indigenous Culture and Resiliency

The event featured traditional drumming, singing and dancing

Hundreds came out in their orange shirts to the Celebration of Indigenous Culture and Resiliency in Penticton's Gyro Park on the second National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. (Brennan Phillips - Western News)
“A Mother’s Cry” is so revered in Nisga’a culture that only the Gitmaxmak’ay Nisga’a Society dancers are permitted to perform musical narration, as seen at Salmon Fest in June 2022.

‘A Mothers Cry’ heard across B.C.’s northwest captures the pain of separation and loss

Hallowed Nisga’a song shares the anguish of stolen children and mothers’ arms left empty

“A Mother’s Cry” is so revered in Nisga’a culture that only the Gitmaxmak’ay Nisga’a Society dancers are permitted to perform musical narration, as seen at Salmon Fest in June 2022.
John Prevost uses art in his own healing journey and to help others. See story on page A6. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)

From residential school to prison, B.C. man has come a long way in healing journey

Decades of addiction led Vancouver Island artist John Prevost to help others

John Prevost uses art in his own healing journey and to help others. See story on page A6. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)
AFN National Chief RoseAnne Archibald speaks at a Miyo-wiciwitowin Day event at Mosaic Stadium in Regina, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. The national chief of the Assembly of First Nations says today’s National Day of Truth and Reconciliation is about the survivors who suffered in Canada’s residential schools and the children who never made it home. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell

Canadians reflect about residential schools on Truth and Reconciliation Day

Speeches and events happen even as the grim work that helped inspire the day continues

AFN National Chief RoseAnne Archibald speaks at a Miyo-wiciwitowin Day event at Mosaic Stadium in Regina, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022. The national chief of the Assembly of First Nations says today’s National Day of Truth and Reconciliation is about the survivors who suffered in Canada’s residential schools and the children who never made it home. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell
Stan Jack is in the center of the two men’s dancers (Jacqueline Gelineau/Capital News)

Westbank First Nation powow dancer shares his regalia

Regalia is the outfit worn for special celebrations

Stan Jack is in the center of the two men’s dancers (Jacqueline Gelineau/Capital News)
Sasha Perron ran 216 kilometres in just 18 days last year – one for each child found at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, plus an extra one for all the children who weren’t found. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)

Next generation looks to take some of the burdens from residential school survivors

Greater Victoria’s Sasha Perron highlights survivors’ strength and resilience

Sasha Perron ran 216 kilometres in just 18 days last year – one for each child found at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, plus an extra one for all the children who weren’t found. (Arnold Lim/Black Press Media)
Shaylene Lakey grew up in Vernon in foster care and continues to live here. (Contributed)

B.C. woman shares journey to reclaim Indigenous heritage after losing it in foster care

Shaylene Lakey may have found a safe place growing up, but felt robbed of her culture

Shaylene Lakey grew up in Vernon in foster care and continues to live here. (Contributed)
Hundreds came out for the second Walk for the Children in Penticton. The journey of 6,000 steps from the Peach to the residential school survivor memorial on the Penticton Indian Band represents the 6,000 children whose bodies were discovered in unmarked graves at residential schools in 2021. (Logan Lockhart - Western News)

VIDEO: Hundreds come out to Walk for the Children in Penticton

“We’re honouring the residential school survivors and those who didn’t make it home”: Penticton Chief

Hundreds came out for the second Walk for the Children in Penticton. The journey of 6,000 steps from the Peach to the residential school survivor memorial on the Penticton Indian Band represents the 6,000 children whose bodies were discovered in unmarked graves at residential schools in 2021. (Logan Lockhart - Western News)
(Photo - Jordy Cunningham/Capital News)

Okanagan College lowers flags for National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Flags were lowered at all Okanagan College campuses

(Photo - Jordy Cunningham/Capital News)
Janet Hanuse (left) with her youngest child Elleanna Hunt. Their family is working on breaking the cycle of intergenerational trauma from residential schools. (Photo by Nicole Crescenzi)

Breaking the cycle: How one B.C. woman’s healing journey is being passed to her children

Janet Hanuse talks about intergenerational trauma and how it’s impacted her family

  • Sep 30, 2022
Janet Hanuse (left) with her youngest child Elleanna Hunt. Their family is working on breaking the cycle of intergenerational trauma from residential schools. (Photo by Nicole Crescenzi)
Elders in the Indigenous community are knowledge keepers. Knowing about your heritage and culture is important for healing, said Richard Jackson Jr. (not pictured). 
(Jacqueline Gelineau - Capital News)

“All of these uniforms I wore had an impact on me”: Okanagan residential school survivor

After returning from residential school, Jackson Jr. was sent to fight in the Vietnam War.

Elders in the Indigenous community are knowledge keepers. Knowing about your heritage and culture is important for healing, said Richard Jackson Jr. (not pictured). 
(Jacqueline Gelineau - Capital News)
Orange Shirt Day founder Phyllis Webstad from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation lives in Williams Lake, B.C. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)

Orange Shirt Society founder hopeful for future of Indigenous families

B.C.’s Phyllis Webstad will be at Niagara Falls for National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Orange Shirt Day founder Phyllis Webstad from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation lives in Williams Lake, B.C. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)