Maisy at her furever home.

Happy endings for pups from Princeton animal seizure

The BC SPCA seized 97 animals living in extremely poor conditions

After 97 animals, who were living in extremely poor conditions, were seized from a Princeton property, the BC SPCA is announcing a happy ending for two of the puppies.

Last September, BC SPCA animal protection officers removed 43 puppies, 24 adult and senior dogs from the B.C. Interior property, after receiving a complaint about animals in distress.

According to Marcie Moriarty, chief prevention and enforcement officer for the BC SPCA, the animals lived without shelter, in unsanitary living conditions, with overcrowding, poor ventilation and were exposed to injurious objects.

The dogs and puppies seized were a range of breeds and breed crosses, including Labrador retrievers, Dalmatians, Corgis, Great Pyrenees, King Charles spaniels, Yorkies, Maltese, Poodles and Australian cattle dogs.

Six of the puppies died due to parvo, and two of the horses had to be euthanized due to poor health.

But, for two of the puppies from the Princeton animal seizure, there is some good news.

After her stay in foster care, Maisy found her forever home with her family on a Salt Spring Island farm.

While the family continues to work with Maisy through her nervousness, her transition to her new home was made easier thanks to another young BC SPCA rescue dog in the family, Arnie.

Diane K, Maisy’s guardian, said more recently, Maisy has befriended a new lamb on the farm, Dylan.

“The cutest part is while Dylan is getting bottle-fed, Maisy is right there licking and cleaning up the spilled milk on his face,” she said. “It’s also pretty cute when they cuddle together on the dog bed.”

Joey at his furever.

Joey, a Corgi, was adopted in December 2020. Joey was a bit shy and uncertain when he first arrived at his new home. However, within a few weeks, his true personality began to shine, stated the BC SPCA.

“He’s very social. He loves meeting other dogs and people. He’s very curious and enjoys exploring the world,” said Joey’s new guardian Anne-Marie.

READ MORE: BC BC SPCA investigates Okanagan woman with prior animal abuse convictions


@Jen_zee
jen.zielinski@bpdigital.ca

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