PHOTOS: Hopeful service dogs get picked up by B.C. trainers drive-thru style

Lassie from Pacific Assistance Dogs Society, PADS, is seen being being picked up by her new trainer from the PADS headquarters in Burnaby, B.C. Friday, May 22, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 restrictions new dog owners had to pick up their new puppies via drive-thru method. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Winn Dixie a dog with the Pacific Assistance Dogs Society, PADS, is seen in the rear view mirror of a car after being picked up by her new trainer from the PADS headquarters in Burnaby, B.C. Friday, May 22, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 restrictions new dog owners had to pick up their new puppies via drive-thru method. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Lassie an assistance dog with the Pacific Assistance Dogs Society, PADS, waits to be picked up by her new trainer from the PADS headquarters in Burnaby, B.C. Friday, May 22, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 restrictions new dog owners had to pick up their new puppies via drive-thru method. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Greg Fuchs gives Winn Dixie, a dog with the Pacific Assistance Dogs Society, PADS, a kiss as she waits to be picked up by her new trainer from the PADS headquarters in Burnaby, B.C. Friday, May 22, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 restrictions new dog owners had to pick up their new puppies via drive-thru method. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

For all the parts of everyday life that the ongoing pandemic has brought to a crashing halt, COVID-19 didn’t stop the Pacific Assistance Dog Society from getting their latest litter of puppies to trainers on Friday (May 22).

PADS, which has existed in the province for more than 30 years, breeds, raises, trains and supports certified assistance dogs, before partnering them with people living with disabilities, and with community care professionals.

Dubbed the “Hollywood Litter,” the society had registered trainers come and pick up their newest four-legged trainees drive-thru-style in Burnaby on Friday.

One by one, trainers would drive up to a tent outside the PADS facility and have their temporary companion placed in their arms.

Each dog is eight weeks old.

Now, the dogs will get trained to do tasks such as: open and close doors, turn lights on and off, retrieve a telephone or other objects, pick up dropped objects, pull manual wheelchairs, carry items like groceries, retrieve medication and provide balance and stability to clients with mobility issues.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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