Who wants to be the boss? Not so many

Despite generally positive attitudes about their bosses, most workers wouldn't want their job.

In new research by staffing firm Accountemps, some employees felt their mangers could improve. Topping the list was communication, cited by 36 per cent of those polled, while giving recognition and helping with career progression were each named by 31 per cent of respondents.

The survey also found most professionals (66 per cent) don’t aspire to have their boss’s job. The primary reason cited was not wanting the added stress and responsibility (46 per cent).

“Most employees appreciate that being a boss has its challenges, and are grateful for their manager’s direction; supervisors should work to maintain this positive rapport by continuing to look for opportunities for improvement, and to actively seek feedback from their staff,” said Dianne Hunnam-Jones, Canadian president of Accountemps.

“Whether or not an employee’s career goals include management, great leaders engage with their workers to determine how they can help improve job satisfaction and encourage professional growth.”

Additional findings from the Accountemps survey include:

• Workers age 18-34 are most eager to move up to their manager’s position, with 51 per cent citing they want their boss’s job compared to 25 per cent of respondents 34-55 and 13 per cent 55 and older.

• Forty-three per cent have left a job because of a strained relationship with a supervisor, and 11 per cent would feel happy if their boss left the company.

• More than one in 10 (15 per cent) professionals 55 and older are unhappy with their boss, the largest of any age group. This group also was the most likely to have quit a job over a strained or dysfunctional relationship with a manager.

• Half of workers surveyed said their boss understands the demands of their job, but 12 per cent noted their supervisor has little understanding of their day-to-day reality.

• Fifty-three per cent of millennials feel their boss recognizes their potential, compared to 61 per cent of workers 55 and older.

• Twenty-two per cent of workers consider their boss a friend, but the majority (59 per cent) cited their relationship as strictly professional.

• The youngest workers had the most extensive wish lists. Most notably, compared to the other age groups, these professionals were more likely to want their managers to provide better support for career progression, communication, recognition for accomplishments and help promoting work-life balance.

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