MICHAELS: Three hour nightmare on local roads highlights need for change

Bridge travelling folk deserve a decent commute

For thousands of the Okanagan’s bridge travelling folk, Tuesday’s commute came with a two- to three-hour bonus.

Two fender benders, is what police chalked this time kill up to. Then they reminded motorists to pay attention when they’re driving.

This, of course, is sound advice. Please, people, when you’re driving, pay attention.

Of course, we as humans aren’t perfect and crashes happen — usually when they’re least convenient.

So the lingering question really is why this incident tacked hours onto the commute? Last week when a pole went down onto Abbott Street and blocked a lane of traffic it added around 45 minutes to the commute. It was almost understandable, albeit annoying. But three hours for a crash where all involved exited their cars and awaited help? That seems a bit much.

It’s absurd and someone at the controls needs to acknowledge there was a bungle that went beyond bad driving during Tuesday’s commute and make sure it doesn’t happen again.

READ MORE: MAJOR DELAYS ON HIGHWAY

The Canadian Automobile Association recently released a report that highlighted the effects of traffic jams for those who can’t apply basic reason to situations of this kind.

“Traffic congestion impacts both the quality of life for individuals and the overall economy. Motorists and passengers give up productive work hours, and precious personal and family time,” reads the report. “When trucks are stuck in traffic, the goods they are moving become more costly to businesses and consumers. The lost productivity from delayed passenger trips and freight deliveries harms regional and national economic competitiveness. Along with delays, congestion increases fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Vehicles idling in traffic consume far more fuel than they otherwise would. And by extension, vehicles emit more greenhouse gases in congested conditions.”

In short, it’s bad for the environment, our morale and our pocketbooks.

So get with it powers that be. It’s time to see some energy expended in this area.

I’d advocate for better transit, and a swift end to car culture, but a co-worker said that her bus-commute was three hours from West Kelowna so it will be hard to get people to get aboard that environmentally-friendly train just yet.

How about just instituting some quick action scene clean up? Some traffic control? Some sensible reaction to non-sensible traffic acts.

People have things to do, places to see and they deserve to have systems in place to allow them to do it.

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@KelownaNewsKat
kmichaels@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Day one of Hometown Hockey in West Kelowna

Special guests, music, games, and free pizza! Hometown Hockey countinues on Sunday.

Kids provide their own ideas during play in Kelowna

Ideas Bobert! is part of the Living Things International Arts Festival

Women’s March draws small crowd in Kelowna

The small, but passionate, group marched along Water Street Saturday

UBCO Heat men’s and women’s basketball squads bounce over MacEwan

The women got their first win of the season, while the men keep their playoff hopes alive

Surrey man fined $10,000 by Kelowna’s Provincial Court

The man was convicted for three Wildlife Act offences after shooting a bull moose not in season

Find me my furever home: Mittens and Boots

Meet Mittens and Boots who are available for adoption at the Kelowna BC SPCA

May plans next move in Brexit fight as chances rise of delay

Some say a lack of action could trigger a ‘public tsunami’

Group challenges ruling for doctors to give referrals for services that clash with beliefs

A group of five Canadian doctors and three professional organizations is appealing

Major winter storm wreaks havoc on U.S. travel

Nearly 5,000 flights were cancelled Sunday around the country

CONSUMER REPORT: What to buy each month in 2019 to save money

Resolve to buy all of the things you want and need, but pay less money for them

Want to avoid the speculation tax on your vacant home? Rent it out, Horgan says

Premier John Horgan and Sheila Malcolmson say speculation and vacancy tax addresses homelessness

UPDATE: B.C. woman and boy, 6, found safe, RCMP confirm

Roseanne Supernault says both she and her six-year-old nephew are fine and she has contacted police

PHOTOS: Women’s Marches take to the streets across B.C. and beyond

Women and allies marched worldwide protesting violence against women, calling for equality

Anxiety in Alaska as endless aftershocks rattle residents

Seismologists expect the temblors to continue for months, although the frequency has lessened

Most Read