(Twitter/@Chief_manley)

FBI agents say U.S. government shutdown affecting operations

Nearly 5,000 special agents, intelligence analysts and other staff are currently furloughed

  • Jan. 10, 2019 10:00 a.m.

The association that represents thousands of FBI agents warned Thursday that a partial government shutdown could cause laboratory delays, reduce money for investigations and make it harder to recruit and retain agents.

The FBI Agents Association sent a petition to the White House and congressional leaders encouraging them to fund the FBI immediately. Friday will be the first day that the nearly 13,000 special agents will miss their paychecks.

“This is not about political for special agents. For special agents, financial security is national security,” Tom O’Connor, the association’s president, told reporters in a conference call.

Nearly 5,000 special agents, intelligence analysts and other staff are currently furloughed. Those absences mean FBI operations are understaffed and subject to delays, including at the FBI lab. And the lapse means fewer tools, such as informants or undercover operations, are available for investigations.

“We have people are not being able to come to work, which means they’re not able to do the work,” O’Connor said. “Which means we’re going to have a backlog.”

READ MORE: Trump pleads on TV for wall funding to fix border ‘crisis’

O’Connor also said the shutdown may cause delays in agents being able to get or renew security clearances, potentially disqualifying some agents from continuing to participate in certain cases, and could make it harder to recruit and retain who could find better paying or more stable jobs outside the government.

The association has more than 14,000 active duty and retired special agent members.

Eric Tucker, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

QUIZ: A celebration of dogs

These are the dog days of summer. How much do you know about dogs?

Pilot project aims to boost entrepreneurial women in the Okanagan

W Venture, a collaborative project, is open for applications until the end of July

Cyclist struck by vehicle in West Kelowna

The cyclist was transported to hospital by ambulance

Police searching for missing Lake Country man

David Anthony Jenken, 65, was reported missing Friday and was last seen on June 28

VIDEO: Musqueam Chief captures captivating footage of bald eagle catching meal

‘This is why we have chosen to live here since time immemorial,’ Chief Wayne Sparrow’s nephew says

First glimpse of Canada’s true COVID-19 infection rate expected mid-July

At least 105,000 Canadians have tested positive for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was identified

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Shuswap resident spots waterspout near Salmon Arm

The rare weather event was spotted early in the morning on July 4.

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

Seymour Arm landslide interrupts drinking water to 500 people

The July 3 slide damaged a water system and a logging road.

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Most Read