BC Ferries, the First Peoples’ Cultural Council, Nuxalk Nation, and Kwakiutl First Nation reveal designs for the Northern Sea Wolf by Danika Naccarella and Richard Hunt at a ceremony at the Atrium Friday. (Keri Coles/News staff)

Indigenous artists reveal artwork that will adorn BC Ferries vessel

Northern Sea Wolf expected to enter service for Port Hardy - Bella Coola in June 2019

BC Ferries and the First Peoples’ Cultural Council reveal in a special ceremony Friday the Indigenous artistic designs that will adorn the Northern Sea Wolf, a BC Ferries vessel that will provide summer service between northern Vancouver Island and B.C.’s Central Coast.

“This work is a visual statement to the vitality of the art and culture that comes from this land and is thriving today,” said Tracey Herbert, CEO of First Peoples’ Cultural Council. “We are so proud to be involved in a project that raises the profile of Indigenous artists and informs travelers of the people who have always lived here and their deep connection to the Salish Sea.”

Kwakiutl First Nation’s Richard Hunt and Nuxalk Nation’s Danika Naccarella designed the artwork that will be featured on the Northern Sea Wolf. The artwork will be displayed on the interior and exterior of the vessel, along with profiles of the artists.

“I am proud to have the opportunity to showcase my culture, Gilakas’la,” said Hunt. “I also want to congratulate fellow artist, Danika Naccarella, and extend my thanks to the Songhees people. I look forward to seeing my design come to life on the Northern Sea Wolf.”

RELATED: Vancouver Island Salish artist’s work to adorn BC ferry

BC Ferries and community stakeholders named the Northern Sea Wolf in honour of a First Nations’ legend in which the Sea Wolf is a manifestation of the Orca. The designs depict the beauty of the majestic animal, with the Sea Wolf the symbol of family, loyalty and the protector of those travelling their waters.

“My design will live on for many years as a representation of my community and our strength. It is an honour to share this opportunity with Richard Hunt and I want to thank BC Ferries and the First Peoples’ Cultural Council for selecting our designs,” Naccarella said. “I hope my artwork will help inspire youth in our community and the next generation of Indigenous artists.”

In December 2017, the First Peoples’ Cultural Council issued a call for artists from the Central Coast to submit their portfolios for consideration. From there, a jury of artist peers and BC Ferries representatives shortlisted artists who were invited to submit design concepts for the Northern Sea Wolf.

The designs of Richard Hunt and Danika Naccarella were chosen for their artistic excellence, Indigenous style and ability to express the vessel name through artwork.

“Richard and Danika have created striking designs which pay tribute to the people of the Central Coast and the territory where we operate,” said Mark Collins, BC Ferries’ president and CEO. “It has been a privilege to work with two exceptionally talented artists and we are honoured to display their designs on our vessel, the Northern Sea Wolf.”

RELATED: Esquimalt Drydock awarded millions in contracts for North Island ferry upgrade

Direct seasonal service between Port Hardy and Bella Coola commenced this September with the Northern Adventure. Starting in spring 2019, the Northern Sea Wolf will provide direct summer service between Port Hardy and Bella Coola, with a connector service once a week between Bella Coola, Bella Bella, Shearwater and Ocean Falls.


 

keri.coles@blackpress.ca

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Kwakiutl First Nation’s Richard Hunt with his artwork that will adorn the Northern Sea Wolf. (Keri Coles/News staff)

Nuxalk Nation’s Danika Naccarella designed artwork that will adorn BC Ferries’ Northern Sea Wolf vessel. (Keri Coles/News staff)

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