Jeff and Sue Turner chronicle nature through the seasons

Sue Turner of Princeton has spent a lifetime capturing the mysteries of wildlife on film.

Never before filmed wildlife and natural events in Canada take center-stage tonight on CBC.

The Wild Canadian Year, produced by Princeton BC residents Jeff and Sue Turner, premiers tonight at 8 p.m. on David Suzuki’s The Nature of Things.

The five-part series features 75 stories filmed in 13 provinces and territories.

Some highlights include the wood frog, frozen solid for six months, that takes its first breaths in spring, and the once almost extinct sea otter that hides rock tools in a secret armpit pouch.

Tonight’s episode explores the early days of spring. It follows arctic fox pups taking their first steps, and black bear cubs learning to climb trees.

The series chronicles the Canadian wilderness throughout the seasons.

“The changing seasons drive the lives of all plants and animals around the world,” said Jeff Turner, who in addition to producing the series also acted as director, cinematographer and writer. “In Canada the effects of the seasons are much more pronounced. The Wild Canadian Year is a legacy series that documents the magnificence of Canada’s wilderness and wildlife and preserves it in a cinematic time capsule for Canada’s 150th.

Jeff and Sue Turner comprise a Princeton husband and wife team who have been making wildlife documentary films for 32 years.

They have directed, shot, written and/or produced more than 40 documentary films for the BBC, Terra Mater, CBC, PBS, Discovery, Animal Planet and Eden channels in settings around the globe.

They have won numerous awards for their work and their films have been seen in more than 50 countries.

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