Kelowna Mounties issue cougar warning for Glenmore area

"Parents of small children and pet owners were urged to exercise caution in the area. .."

 

Mounties issued a cougar warning for the Glenmore area Friday night.


At around 6 p.m., Jan. 15, Kelowna RCMP were alerted that an area resident had spotted a cougar on Bello Road, in teh Glenmore area.

Staff Sgt. John Jordan sent out the alert, pointing out that parents of small children and pet owners were urged to exercise caution in the area.

Cougar attacks are very rare, as they tend to avoid high traffic areas, but they’re not unheard of.

A B.C. government website has some useful information on how to deal with the creatures, which, they point out are unpredictable and top of the food chain.

“We have little understanding about what might trigger an attack, but following these general guidelines will reduce the risk of cougar conflict and prepare you in the unlikely event of an attack,” reads their page on the creatures.

 

Children:

Cougars seem to be attracted to children, possibly because their high-pitched voices, small size, and erratic movements make it difficult for cougars to identify them as human and not prey.

  • Talk to children and teach them what to do if they encounter a cougar.
  • Encourage children to play outdoors in groups, and supervise children playing outdoors.
  • Consider getting a dog for your children as an early-warning system. A dog can see, smell, and hear a cougar sooner then we can. Although dogs offer little value as a deterrent to cougars, they may distract a cougar from attacking a human.
  • Consider erecting a fence around play areas.
  • Keep a radio playing.
  • Make sure children are home before dusk and stay inside until after dawn.
  • If there have been cougar sightings, escort children to the bus stop in the early morning. Clear shrubs away around the bus stop, making an area with a nine-metre (30 foot) radius. Have a light installed as a general safety precaution.

Your yard and home:

  • Do not attract or feed wildlife, especially deer or raccoons. These are natural prey and may attract cougars.

Pets:

  • Roaming pets are easy prey.
  • Bring pets in at night. If they must be left out, confine them in a kennel with a secure top.
  • Do not feed pets outside. This not only attracts young cougars but also many small animals, such as mice and raccoons, that cougars prey upon.
  • Place domestic livestock in an enclosed shed or barn at night.