Letter: The butt-ugly truth

Cigarette butt litter is a worldwide pollution problem that needs to be addressed.

To the editor:

According to World Health Organization, it is estimated that over 15 billion cigarettes are sold each day worldwide.

Over 4.5 trillion cigarette butts are littered worldwide every year – that is about two billion pounds of chemical trash. Cigarette filters are the #1 trash item found worldwide and only 10 per cent  are properly disposed of.

It rains a lot in Vancouver; on an annual basis in the greater Vancouver region we encounter about 1,200 mm of rain.

When it does rain, butts from all over town get washed into storm drains carried by wind and rain, and they empty right into our water source. They pollute our water, and are ingested by wildlife. Often these filters are mistaken as food by fishes, birds and other marine mammals.

Not just thousands, not even hundreds of thousands, but millions upon millions of filters end up in our eco-system.

Filters release the same toxic and cancer causing chemicals found in cigarettes such as; Benzene (chemical derived from petroleum), Ethylphenol and Arsenic.

It can actually take up to 15 years for filters to degrade because of the Cellulose Acetate, a plastic material that makes up the filters.

Cigarette filters are toxic solid waste, and they negatively impact our water chemistry. The chemicals leach out of discarded butts into our streams, rivers and eventually into the Pacific Ocean.

They may be small in size; however, these little butts have the ability to do some major damage in our aquatic eco-system.

They negatively affect the health of animals that humans may eventually consume as food, jeopardizing our long term health and wellbeing. .

Smokers who treat outdoor spaces as public ashtrays may reconsider their behaviour when they learn that cigarette butts are made of plastic, not of cotton and paper. Worse, that cigarette butts contain chemicals that can kill some of the animals that occupy critical positions in aquatic communities.

It is important that we don’t end this topic of conversation, in order to decrease this source of pollution. The possession of knowledge is power; that alone, can alleviate the problems we face today.

Vanessa Vuen S. Parrenas

Grade 12 student, RC Palmer Secondary School


Just Posted

Two people safe after falling through ice

Kelowna Fire Department urges caution around icy waters during warm weather

Missing Kelowna woman sought

RCMP are asking for assistance in locating Christine Olsen-Meissnitzer

Plane lands safely after takeoff issue

An airplane departing Kelowna International Airport had an issue with a landing gear, landed safely

KSS rocks and rolls for 37th straight year

Kelowna secondary students let loose with annual Air Bank competition

YMCA launches teen program for mental health

Starting April 5, the Kelowna Family Y will host its first run of Mind Fit

REPLAY: B.C. this week in video

In case you missed it, here’s a look at replay-worthy highlights from across the province this week

Captain Cal Foote is Rockets’ MVP

The Rockets hand out their annual team awards Sunday at Kelowna Community Theatre

Anti-pipeline protestors block Kinder Morgan tanker near Seattle

Protest was spurred on by the 28 anti-Kinder Morgan activists arrested in Burnaby

Some surprises in new book about B.C. labour movement

“On the Line” charts history of the union movement back to the 1800s

Cancer fundraiser takes to Okanagan Lake

Penticton and Naramata joining growing fundraising event

Elke’s Garden Tips: Good time to prepare

Lake Country garden columnist talks about what to do at this time of the year

Letter: Crying fowl over goose cull witness

Kelowna letter-writer says Canada geese come with many issues

Letter: I was born in Kelowna in 1930…

Kelowna letter-writer has some ideas on how things should run nowadays

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Most Read