Letter: Trump protesters don’t speak for all Canadians

"The very benefits the protesters are enjoying by being free to protest, they are railing against. How oxymoron."

To the editor:

Re: The anti-Trump protest in Kelowna on Nov. 20.

The protesters had the audacity to say “they speak for Canadians.” A handful of reactive young people are speaking for 36 million Canadians? How egotistical!

We just witnessed democracy as good as it gets in the U.S. Some 60 million citizens voted for Donald Trump despite the fierce attacks against him.

The very benefits the protesters are enjoying by being free to protest, they are railing against. How oxymoron.

With Trump’s election, he has already made job possibilities for Canadians by cancelling the TPP, which is not a trade agreement but an investors’ rights agreement that would bring in an onslaught of foreign workers. [Editor’s Note: The Trans-Pacific Partnership has not been ratified, so is not yet in effect.]

Instead of watching the news media, I would suggest that you get on your knees and ask for discernment and a change of heart so that there would be unity and understanding.

And if you want to protest, why not protest the disastrous carbon tax that will affect everything you purchase.

Nel Dreger, Kelowna

 

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