Amazing Race Canada host Jon Montgomery shows off one of the beautiful birds of prey and the gauntlet glove that each team had to use in a Cowichan Valley challenge at The Raptors Centre. (Submitted)

Amazing Race Canada host Jon Montgomery shows off one of the beautiful birds of prey and the gauntlet glove that each team had to use in a Cowichan Valley challenge at The Raptors Centre. (Submitted)

‘Amazing Race Canada’ competitors face B.C. challenge

They drove Corvettes, mastered falconry basics, and ate blueberry pie in the Cowichan Valley

“The Amazing Race Canada” came to the Cowichan Valley for its entitled “Sounds Like a Wild Boar,” which aired Tuesday night.

Race day began in Dawson City, Yukon, but the competitors soon were winging towards Saltspring Island for their first challenge of the day.

They had to find the famous Saltspring Saturday Market, and then locate a baking stall where substantial home-cooked blueberry pies awaited.

Everyone was commenting, “Oh, I love pie!” Little did they know.

Each competitor had to wolf down a whole pie, and, some of them find it hard going. Barf buckets were nearby, but were never really needed, although one candidate, Martina, leaned over the container and made a sound that the others said was “like a wild boar.”

One Amazing Race Express Pass, won previously, was used by a team that just couldn’t finish. Nobody wanted to even hear the word “pie” after that.

Once they’d cleared the pie hurdle, the racers hopped in their cars and drove across Saltspring to catch the ferry to Crofton on Vancouver Island. From there, under rainy skies, they had to make their way to the Island Motorsport Circuit.

Once at the circuit — a test track custom built for high-end sports cars — one member of each team had to ease themselves behind the wheel of a hot 2018 Corvette Grand Sport convertible and drive it around the wet track rally-style: finishing in a specified time while keeping their speed under 80 km/hour.

Several competitors were itching to wind the motor up, but only one driver, Courtney, was penalized for her lead foot.

Then, they all had to find the Pacific Northwest Raptors Centre where they would have to “tie the knot.”

Surprisingly, this was the challenge where the rubber really met the road.

The other member of each team had to tie a special falconers’ knot, one-handed, while balancing one of the centre’s renowned raptors on the other hand, which was suitably covered by a falconer’s glove.

Running this gauntlet was simple for some. Todd and Courtney whizzed through, while others took a while before they even got close to figuring it out.

Eventually, everyone had to cross the finish line in the centre of the Kinsol Trestle — the superbly reconstructed all-wooden bridge that spans the Koksilah River in the south end of the Cowichan Valley.

One team was eliminated in this episode: Joseph and Akash were stuck for ages at the Raptors Centre, despite getting to the Vancouver Island ferry first.

Next week, the teams will take off for Jakarta, Indonesia, and some unique Asian adventures.

Just Posted

Kelowna flags were flown at half-mast after the discovery of a residential school burial site in Kamloops. (File photo)
Central Okanagan school board chair reflects on recent tragedies

Moyra Baxter offers condolenses to residential school victims, slain Muslim family

The Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race has been held in Summerland as a fundraising event. Do you know which Canadian city introduced this sport? (Black Press file photo)
QUIZ: A summer’s day at the water

How much do you know about boats, lakes and water?

The RCMP presence in Central Okanagan public schools is being reviewed by the board of education. (File photo)
RCMP presence welcomed in Central Okanagan public schools

Staff survey feedback overwhelmingly positive from students, staff and parents

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

Jane Linden
KCR: Volunteering keeps you active

Kelowna Community Resources shares stories of its volunteers in a weekly column

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

Most Read