Colin Basran addresses supporters at The Curious Cafe after being elected for a second term as mayor of Kelowna on Oct. 20, 2018. (Marissa Tiel/ Kelowna Capital News)

Colin Basran addresses supporters at The Curious Cafe after being elected for a second term as mayor of Kelowna on Oct. 20, 2018. (Marissa Tiel/ Kelowna Capital News)

Updated: Basran re-elected Kelowna’s next mayor

Basran won with 56.95 of the vote. The next closest was Tom Dyas with 29.92 per cent of the vote.

“This feels so good.”

That’s how newly re-elected mayor Colin Basran described a hard-fought election win, which he attributed to his campaign team and supporters.

“Many times when I have been really low, they pick me up and they say, ‘get out there. You are the only candidate with experience who knows what they are talking about,’” Basran said to the crowd at the Curious Cafe on Ellis Street, shortly after 9:45 p.m., when it became clear that he was next mayor of Kelowna.

READ MORE: BASRAN RE-ELECTED

“And I am so proud to have them by my side each and every time and they would go to the wall for me and I am blessed with the best campaign team, absolutely, in the business.”

Basran said that he thought that other candidates ran amazing campaigns and, one way or another, did the best they could to get issues heard, noting “the things they shared will make this city better.”

“That being said, I am so excited to work with this new council. I am so excited all the incumbents got in because we we get along so well because we did amazing things together,” he said.

READ MORE: LAKE COUNTRY ELECTS BAKER

While Basran earned 18,118 of a potential 32,132 votes. Tom Dyas earned 9,518 votes. It was a clear win over someone who once was Basran’s friend, and entered this race having to answer questions about his decision to run against someone he previously supported.

Dyas’s campaign gathered at the Kanata Hotel, and once the votes were tallied and he made time to speak to media, he said he believed he could repair the close friendship he enjoyed with Basran prior to the campaign.

“In business, numerous times I have competed against individuals who are friends. Sometimes you win the business deal, sometimes you don’t. In sports, I have competed in championship games against individuals who are friends, and we are still friends to this day,” he said.

“I believe the mature aspect of it looking forward — yes there will be some communications going forward that will be little rustier than they were before, but I believe in time the issue we debated in this campaign will generate something good for the community’s benefit.”

In the race, Dyas told voters leadership was lacking and that’s why he decided to run for mayor, Basran pointed to a healthy local economy, strides made on issues such as homelessness, infrastructure improvement, inclusivity and the arts over the last four years as signs the city was moving forward under his leadership.

READ MORE: PEACHLAND ELECTS GOUGH

Basran ran on his record, and that of council, over the last four years, while Dyas repeatedly accused the city of not listening to residents or business, something he, a former two-term president of the Kelowna Chamber of Commerce, vowed to change.

He proposed moving city hall and the Water Street fire hall out of the downtown core and using the land city hall currently sits on as the site of a new performing arts centre. He did not say where the money would come from to buy the land required, or build the new buildings, just said discussions needed to start.

He also said he would reopen discussions about creating city police force to replace the RCMP and said he has had talks with a local private family trust that wants to build a “ranch” on the outskirts of Kelowna to house the city’s homeless and treat those with addictions there with “wrap-around” support services.

Transportation could be provided to ferry ranch-residents to and from downtown to avail of any additional services they would need, said Dyas

For the other two men in the race, Bob Schewe and Bobby Kennedy, the issues of street crime downtown (Schewe) and the city capitalizing on the recent legalization of cannabis with a “city cannabis tax” to raise revenue (Kennedy), were most often given top priority on the in their campaign presentations.

Downtown safety and how to address it, was the a top issue in both the mayoral and council races.

Dyas, Schewe and Kennedy said they felt the situation downtown is getting worse and laid the blame at the feet of Basran and the current council. Basran defended what the city has done to try and address it by saying more resources have been provided—and need to continue to be provided—to the RCMP and city bylaw officers, and the city’s Journey Home strategy to address homelessness will also help.

But Dyas, Schewe and Kennedy all said they felt the Journey Home strategy, while worthwhile, did not address the issue of homelessness or associated crime and addiction services in the short term.

Council will be comprised of Maxine DeHart, Gail Given, Luke Stack, Mohini Singh, Brad Sieben, Charlie Hodge, Ryan Donn and newcomer Loyal Wooldridge.

To report a typo, email:
newstips@kelownacapnews.com
.


@KelownaCapNews
newstips@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

MUNICIPAL ELECTION 2018 RESULTS
Infogram

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Updated: Basran re-elected Kelowna’s next mayor

Updated: Basran re-elected Kelowna’s next mayor

Colin Basran speaks with media at The Curious Cafe after being elected for a second term as mayor of Kelowna on Oct. 20, 2018. (Marissa Tiel/ Kelowna Capital News)

Colin Basran speaks with media at The Curious Cafe after being elected for a second term as mayor of Kelowna on Oct. 20, 2018. (Marissa Tiel/ Kelowna Capital News)

Colin Basran kisses his wife Leanne after he was elected for a second term as mayor of Kelowna on Oct. 20, 2018. Basran supporters gathered at The Curious Cafe on Ellis Street in Kelowna, B.C. (Marissa Tiel/ Kelowna Capital News)

Colin Basran kisses his wife Leanne after he was elected for a second term as mayor of Kelowna on Oct. 20, 2018. Basran supporters gathered at The Curious Cafe on Ellis Street in Kelowna, B.C. (Marissa Tiel/ Kelowna Capital News)

Just Posted

Calls for potential overdoses in B.C. spiked in 2020, especially in the Okanagan - Shuswap. Pictured above is a BCEHS re-enactment of paramedics attending an overdose. (BCHES photo)
UBCO program increases drug checking availability in Kelowna, Penticton, Vernon

January 2021 data shows of 95 opioid samples tested across Interior Health, 93 contained fentanyl

Person experiencing homelessness. (Black Press Media file photo)
Program preventing youth homelessness launches in Kelowna

Upstream Project’s goal is to help young people become more resilient

Youth from Vernon, Kelowna, Penticton and the Kootenays were able to dig into two evenings of online learning and connection through United Way Southern Interior B.C.’s <CODE>anagan program. (Submitted)<code> </code>
CODEanagan gives youth a chance to learn about technology

The youth, aged 12 to 21, built their own WordPress sites and developed blogging ideas

A rainbow shining on Kelowna General Hospital on May 12, 2020 International Nurses Day. (Steve Wensley - Prime Light Media)
New COVID cases trending down in Interior Health

24 new cases reported Thursday, Feb. 25, death at Kelowna General Hospital

The Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit of British Columbia’s (CFSEU-BC) Uniform Gang Enforcement Team (UGET) has arrested a man who was on the run for nearly a decade. (File photo)
9-year search for international drug trafficking suspect ends with arrest at YVR

Khamla Wong, charged in 2012, taken into custody Feb. 24 by BC-CFSEU

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)
B.C. reports 10 additional deaths, 395 new COVID-19 cases

The majority of new coronavirus infections were in the Fraser Health region

A new survey has found that virtual visits are British Columbian’s preferred way to see the doctor amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Unsplash)
Majority of British Columbians now prefer routine virtual doctor’s visits: study

More than 82% feel virtual health options reduce wait times, 64% think they lead to better health

Larch Place is the first building to be built in the BC Housing, Canadian Mental Health Association housing project at the corner of Third Street SW and Fifth Avenue SW. This view is from the Shuswap Street side where it sits behind the Graystone East building. (File photo)
Opening of doors at new housing development in Salmon Arm welcomed

BC Housing announces opening of 32 rental units, with 35 more expected in summer 2021

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen, all 20, drown in the Sooke River in February 2020. (Contributed photos)
Coroner confirms ‘puddle jumping’ in 2020 drowning deaths of 3 B.C. men

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen pulled into raging river driving through nearby flooding

Castlegar doctor Megan Taylor contracted COVID-19 in November. This photo was taken before the pandemic. Photo: Submitted
Kootenay doctor shares experience contracting COVID-19

Castlegar doctor shares her COVID experience

Vancouver International Women in Film Festival kicks off March 5.
Women in Film Festival features two B.C. filmmakers

The 16th annual festival kicks off March 5, 2021

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The booklet roots present day activism in the history of racist policies, arguing the history must be acknowledged in order to change. (CCPA)
New resource dives into 150 years of racist policy in B.C.

Racist history must be acknowledged in order to change, authors say

Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller, before she knew she would change literature. Photo Wikipedia
And Then There Were None

What book knocked your booties off when you were young?

Most Read